Video

VIDEO: New diagnostic tests require different way of thinking

WASHINGTON — In this video from the World Anti-Microbial Resistance Congress, Cornelius (Neil) J. Clancy, MD, associate professor of medicine and director of the mycology program at the University of Pittsburgh, discusses the recent surge in development of rapid, non-culture diagnostics for infectious diseases.

As a clinician, it is important to start thinking about how to incorporate these novel tools and technologies into patient management and stewardship strategies.

“In a lot of ways, this is a different way of thinking as clinicians than we’ve become accustomed to with culture-based diagnostics,” he said. “Ultimately, the decision is up to our clinical discretion.”

Clancy encourages clinicians to start thinking about their patient populations and how these new diagnostic tests can be used for improved patient management.

Disclosure: Clancy reports serving on the speakers bureau for T2 Biosystems.

WASHINGTON — In this video from the World Anti-Microbial Resistance Congress, Cornelius (Neil) J. Clancy, MD, associate professor of medicine and director of the mycology program at the University of Pittsburgh, discusses the recent surge in development of rapid, non-culture diagnostics for infectious diseases.

As a clinician, it is important to start thinking about how to incorporate these novel tools and technologies into patient management and stewardship strategies.

“In a lot of ways, this is a different way of thinking as clinicians than we’ve become accustomed to with culture-based diagnostics,” he said. “Ultimately, the decision is up to our clinical discretion.”

Clancy encourages clinicians to start thinking about their patient populations and how these new diagnostic tests can be used for improved patient management.

Disclosure: Clancy reports serving on the speakers bureau for T2 Biosystems.