CDC highlights state-level progress against antibiotic resistance

Photo of Brenda Fitzgerald
Brenda Fitzgerald

The CDC used new data to highlight accomplishments made in several U.S. states to combat antibiotic resistance.

Congress has appropriated $323 million over the past 2 fiscal years to fund the CDC’s Antibiotic Resistance Solutions Initiative. The new data came from the CDC’s Antibiotic Resistance (AR) Investment Map, an interactive tool that shows how much the agency has invested in each state to meet national goals to prevent drug-resistant infections.

“Antibiotic resistance has the potential to impact all Americans at every stage of life,” CDC Director Brenda Fitzgerald, MD, said in a statement. “This interactive map showcases the work happening on the frontlines of every state and CDC’s commitment to keep people safe from drug-resistant infections.”

In a news release, the CDC said it made investments in 2016 at the state level and in 50 cities and Puerto Rico “to enhance laboratory and epidemiology expertise and grow public health innovations to fight antibiotic resistance across health care settings, food, and communities.”

According to the agency, the investments led Oklahoma and Connecticut to identify and contain a single case of Candida auris, an emerging and often drug-resistant fungus with a high potential to cause hospital outbreaks that is akin to a superbug.

Among other successes documented by the map, the CDC said Michigan reduced carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae by 30% in 40 facilities and prevented more than 300 infections through a surveillance and prevention initiative, Kentucky contained an outbreak of an unnamed resistance gene and California improved its local response capacity to combat drug-resistant gonorrhea and increased rapid susceptibility testing by eightfold.

References:

CDC. Antibiotic resistance investment map. 2017. https://wwwn.cdc.gov/arinvestments. Accessed January 10, 2018.

CDC. What CDC is doing: AR Solutions Initiative. 2018. https://www.cdc.gov/drugresistance/solutions-initiative/index.html. Accessed January 10, 2018.

Disclosure: Fitzgerald is the CDC director.

Photo of Brenda Fitzgerald
Brenda Fitzgerald

The CDC used new data to highlight accomplishments made in several U.S. states to combat antibiotic resistance.

Congress has appropriated $323 million over the past 2 fiscal years to fund the CDC’s Antibiotic Resistance Solutions Initiative. The new data came from the CDC’s Antibiotic Resistance (AR) Investment Map, an interactive tool that shows how much the agency has invested in each state to meet national goals to prevent drug-resistant infections.

“Antibiotic resistance has the potential to impact all Americans at every stage of life,” CDC Director Brenda Fitzgerald, MD, said in a statement. “This interactive map showcases the work happening on the frontlines of every state and CDC’s commitment to keep people safe from drug-resistant infections.”

In a news release, the CDC said it made investments in 2016 at the state level and in 50 cities and Puerto Rico “to enhance laboratory and epidemiology expertise and grow public health innovations to fight antibiotic resistance across health care settings, food, and communities.”

According to the agency, the investments led Oklahoma and Connecticut to identify and contain a single case of Candida auris, an emerging and often drug-resistant fungus with a high potential to cause hospital outbreaks that is akin to a superbug.

Among other successes documented by the map, the CDC said Michigan reduced carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae by 30% in 40 facilities and prevented more than 300 infections through a surveillance and prevention initiative, Kentucky contained an outbreak of an unnamed resistance gene and California improved its local response capacity to combat drug-resistant gonorrhea and increased rapid susceptibility testing by eightfold.

References:

CDC. Antibiotic resistance investment map. 2017. https://wwwn.cdc.gov/arinvestments. Accessed January 10, 2018.

CDC. What CDC is doing: AR Solutions Initiative. 2018. https://www.cdc.gov/drugresistance/solutions-initiative/index.html. Accessed January 10, 2018.

Disclosure: Fitzgerald is the CDC director.