New point-of-care diagnostic test rapidly detects infectious bacteria

A researcher at Michigan State University has created a molecular, point-of-care diagnostic system, known as In-Dx, that can quickly identify infectious bacteria within 2 hours, potentially offering a way to improve antibiotic stewardship, according to a press release.

“Right now, multiple antibiotics are typically used because doctors don’t know what specific infection they have to fight until days later,” Brett Etchebarne, MD, PhD, assistant professor of emergency medicine at Michigan State University’s College of Osteopathic Medicine, said in the press release. “This way of treating patients is what helps create the drug-resistance problem.”

Credit: G.L. Kohuth, Michigan State University
The In-Dx point-of-care test, developed by Brett Etchebarne at Michigan State University, can detect life-threatening bacteria.
Source: G.L. Kohuth, Michigan State University

The results are promising 1 year into the clinical trial to validate this new diagnostic method. In-Dx, compatible with microchip and smartphone technology, can produce positive culture results in 2 hours, as opposed to the days it takes in a hospital setting.

To detect the bacteria, Etchebarne concentrates a collected sample into a smaller amount, then applies heat to break down the cells. The sample is placed into the In-Dx testing panel, and after 20 minutes, the positive sample changes color, showing the invading organism.

After analyzing approximately 300 clinical blood, urine, spit, wound, stool or cerebral fluid samples, In-Dx identified nearly 85% of exact bacteria. For infections like sepsis that are life threatening if not treated properly and rapidly, definitive diagnosis can save millions of people globally each year. 

“In-Dx has high sensitivity and specificity for detection of the most common infectious organisms, which will help physicians quickly rule in or rule out specific offending bacteria,” Etchebarne said in the release. “By singling out the offending bacteria at the point-of-care, we can immediately improve a doctor’s ability to prescribe the right antibiotic, help minimize the drug-resistance problem that we face today and save lives.”by Savannah Demko


Disclosure: Etchebarne reports no relevant financial disclosures.

A researcher at Michigan State University has created a molecular, point-of-care diagnostic system, known as In-Dx, that can quickly identify infectious bacteria within 2 hours, potentially offering a way to improve antibiotic stewardship, according to a press release.

“Right now, multiple antibiotics are typically used because doctors don’t know what specific infection they have to fight until days later,” Brett Etchebarne, MD, PhD, assistant professor of emergency medicine at Michigan State University’s College of Osteopathic Medicine, said in the press release. “This way of treating patients is what helps create the drug-resistance problem.”

Credit: G.L. Kohuth, Michigan State University
The In-Dx point-of-care test, developed by Brett Etchebarne at Michigan State University, can detect life-threatening bacteria.
Source: G.L. Kohuth, Michigan State University

The results are promising 1 year into the clinical trial to validate this new diagnostic method. In-Dx, compatible with microchip and smartphone technology, can produce positive culture results in 2 hours, as opposed to the days it takes in a hospital setting.

To detect the bacteria, Etchebarne concentrates a collected sample into a smaller amount, then applies heat to break down the cells. The sample is placed into the In-Dx testing panel, and after 20 minutes, the positive sample changes color, showing the invading organism.

After analyzing approximately 300 clinical blood, urine, spit, wound, stool or cerebral fluid samples, In-Dx identified nearly 85% of exact bacteria. For infections like sepsis that are life threatening if not treated properly and rapidly, definitive diagnosis can save millions of people globally each year. 

“In-Dx has high sensitivity and specificity for detection of the most common infectious organisms, which will help physicians quickly rule in or rule out specific offending bacteria,” Etchebarne said in the release. “By singling out the offending bacteria at the point-of-care, we can immediately improve a doctor’s ability to prescribe the right antibiotic, help minimize the drug-resistance problem that we face today and save lives.”by Savannah Demko


Disclosure: Etchebarne reports no relevant financial disclosures.