In the Journals

Novel anti-tumor agent may inhibit cell growth in HCC patients

Hepatocellular carcinoma cell growth in vitro was suppressed by 6-fluoro-3-formylchromone through cell cycle arrest that induced apoptosis, according to data from a recent study.

Researchers bought human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells (SMMC-7721) from the Chinese Academy of Sciences Cell Bank, treated them with doses ranging from 0 mcg/mL to 20 mcg/mL 6-fluoro-3-formylchromone (FCC) for 48 hours and analyzed the effects on cell growth after 24 hours.

The cell growth inhibition rate and apoptosis also were measured at 48 and 72 hours after treatment, and researchers said the proliferation of cells was inhibited by the FCC treatment based on time. The HCC cells exhibited a 21.5% increase in G0/G1 phases (63.8% to 85.3%), and the percentages of apoptotic cells increased in the treated group compared with a control group (P<.05) in a dose-dependent manner.

Researchers also tested FCC’s effect on PCNA, Bax and Bcl-2 protein expressions and learned that PCNA and Bcl-2 were suppressed (P<.05), while Bax increased, according to Western blot analysis. FCC induced apoptosis in HCC cells by increasing the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio.

“Our data demonstrated that FCC could inhibit the proliferation of SMMC-7721 cells in vitro and it could down-regulate PCNA and Bcl-2 expression and up-regulate Bax expression,” researchers said. “The results indicated that FCC could be developed as a novel anti-tumor agent for treating HCC.”

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

Hepatocellular carcinoma cell growth in vitro was suppressed by 6-fluoro-3-formylchromone through cell cycle arrest that induced apoptosis, according to data from a recent study.

Researchers bought human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells (SMMC-7721) from the Chinese Academy of Sciences Cell Bank, treated them with doses ranging from 0 mcg/mL to 20 mcg/mL 6-fluoro-3-formylchromone (FCC) for 48 hours and analyzed the effects on cell growth after 24 hours.

The cell growth inhibition rate and apoptosis also were measured at 48 and 72 hours after treatment, and researchers said the proliferation of cells was inhibited by the FCC treatment based on time. The HCC cells exhibited a 21.5% increase in G0/G1 phases (63.8% to 85.3%), and the percentages of apoptotic cells increased in the treated group compared with a control group (P<.05) in a dose-dependent manner.

Researchers also tested FCC’s effect on PCNA, Bax and Bcl-2 protein expressions and learned that PCNA and Bcl-2 were suppressed (P<.05), while Bax increased, according to Western blot analysis. FCC induced apoptosis in HCC cells by increasing the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio.

“Our data demonstrated that FCC could inhibit the proliferation of SMMC-7721 cells in vitro and it could down-regulate PCNA and Bcl-2 expression and up-regulate Bax expression,” researchers said. “The results indicated that FCC could be developed as a novel anti-tumor agent for treating HCC.”

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.