In the Journals

Rising HCC incidence slowing in US, except in certain subgroups

Although the incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma continued to rise, researchers discovered the rate of increase slowed between 2010 and 2012, except among high risk subgroups in certain geographic regions.

“This 50 state population-based descriptive study has confirmed the overall rising HCC incidence rates,” Hashem B. El-Serag, MD, MPH, of Baylor College of Medicine and the Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Houston, Texas, and colleagues wrote. “However, it is not clear whether the recent slowing down in the overall rates since 2009 represents pending decline rates.”

To determine recent HCC trends in the U.S., including an evaluation of geographic and racial/ethnic differences, El-Serag and colleagues evaluated data from the U.S. Cancer Statistics registry, which covered 97% of the population in 2012.

They found that from 2000 to 2012, the incidence of HCC increased from 4.4 to 6.7 per 100,000, with an annual increase of 4.5% (95% CI, 4.3-4.7) between 2000 and 2009, and 0.7% (95% CI, –0.2-1.6) from 2010 through 2012.

Among men, the average annual percentage change from 2000 to 2012 was greater compared with women (3.7% vs. 2.7%), and was highest among individuals aged 55 to 59 years (8.9%; 95% CI, 7.1-10.7) and among individuals aged 60 to 64 years (6.4%; 95% CI, 4.7-8.2).

Notably, the rate of HCC among Hispanics surpassed that of Asians by 2012.

In addition, HCC rates in Texas surpassed those in Hawaii by the same year (9.71 vs. 9.68 per 100,000), and Texas had the highest age-adjusted HCC rates in the nation.

“Likely reflecting the shift in risk factors from HBV to HCV, alcohol and NAFLD, the largest overall increases in rates were seen among men between ages 55 to 64, especially those born in the HCV peak era, and among Hispanics, whom now for the first time have surpassed rates in Asians and Pacific Islanders, with Texas now surpassing Hawaii as the state most affected by HCC,” the researchers concluded. “States and large urban areas with high and/or increasing HCC incidence rates should address provisions for detection and treatment of underlying risk factors.” – by Adam Leitenberger

Disclosures: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

Although the incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma continued to rise, researchers discovered the rate of increase slowed between 2010 and 2012, except among high risk subgroups in certain geographic regions.

“This 50 state population-based descriptive study has confirmed the overall rising HCC incidence rates,” Hashem B. El-Serag, MD, MPH, of Baylor College of Medicine and the Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Houston, Texas, and colleagues wrote. “However, it is not clear whether the recent slowing down in the overall rates since 2009 represents pending decline rates.”

To determine recent HCC trends in the U.S., including an evaluation of geographic and racial/ethnic differences, El-Serag and colleagues evaluated data from the U.S. Cancer Statistics registry, which covered 97% of the population in 2012.

They found that from 2000 to 2012, the incidence of HCC increased from 4.4 to 6.7 per 100,000, with an annual increase of 4.5% (95% CI, 4.3-4.7) between 2000 and 2009, and 0.7% (95% CI, –0.2-1.6) from 2010 through 2012.

Among men, the average annual percentage change from 2000 to 2012 was greater compared with women (3.7% vs. 2.7%), and was highest among individuals aged 55 to 59 years (8.9%; 95% CI, 7.1-10.7) and among individuals aged 60 to 64 years (6.4%; 95% CI, 4.7-8.2).

Notably, the rate of HCC among Hispanics surpassed that of Asians by 2012.

In addition, HCC rates in Texas surpassed those in Hawaii by the same year (9.71 vs. 9.68 per 100,000), and Texas had the highest age-adjusted HCC rates in the nation.

“Likely reflecting the shift in risk factors from HBV to HCV, alcohol and NAFLD, the largest overall increases in rates were seen among men between ages 55 to 64, especially those born in the HCV peak era, and among Hispanics, whom now for the first time have surpassed rates in Asians and Pacific Islanders, with Texas now surpassing Hawaii as the state most affected by HCC,” the researchers concluded. “States and large urban areas with high and/or increasing HCC incidence rates should address provisions for detection and treatment of underlying risk factors.” – by Adam Leitenberger

Disclosures: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.