Liver cancer mortality rates increasing significantly in the U.S.

Liver cancer mortality increased from the ninth leading cause of cancer death in 2000 to sixth leading cause in 2016, according to a report published by the CDC.

“This report provides the most recent trends in liver cancer mortality by sex, race and Hispanic origin, and age group for adults aged 25 and over,” Jiaquan Xu, MD, from the CDC in Georgia, wrote in the report. “From 2000 through 2016, death rates increased significantly for both men and women, with the death rate for men between two and two and a half times the rate for women.”

Among adults aged 25 years and older, liver cancer mortality increased 43% from 7.2 per 100,000 standard U.S. population in 2000 to 10.3 per 100,000 in 2016. Specifically, rates increased by 43% for men and 40% for women.

Liver cancer mortality increased by 48% for white individuals, 43% for black individuals and 27% for Hispanic individuals. In contrast, mortality rates decreased by 22% for Asian and Pacific Islander individuals.

Liver cancer MRI

Xu reported that liver cancer rates remained stable for adults aged 25 years to 44 years. All adults aged 45 years and older had increased rates between 2000 and 2016, with adults aged 45 years to 54 years showing a decrease between 2012 and 2016. Adults aged 75 years and older had the highest liver cancer mortality rate over the time period of 35%.

Regionally, liver cancer mortality rates were highest in Washington, D.C. (16.8 per 100,000), Louisiana (13.8 per 100,000), Hawaii (12.7 per 100,000) and New Mexico (12.4 per 100,000); whereas the lowest rates were in Vermont (6 per 100,000), Maine (7.4 per 100,000), Montana (7.7 per 100,000) and Utah and Nebraska (each 7.8 per 100,000).

For more recent data on liver cancer risks and novel methods of detection, read more Healio reports from 2017 and 2018.

Reference : Xu JQ. Trends in liver cancer mortality among adults aged 25 and over in the United States, 2000–2016. NCHS Data Brief, no 314. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. Available at https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/products/databriefs/db314.htm. Accessed July 18, 2018.

Disclosure: Healio was unable to confirm Xu’s relevant financial disclosures prior to publication.

Liver cancer mortality increased from the ninth leading cause of cancer death in 2000 to sixth leading cause in 2016, according to a report published by the CDC.

“This report provides the most recent trends in liver cancer mortality by sex, race and Hispanic origin, and age group for adults aged 25 and over,” Jiaquan Xu, MD, from the CDC in Georgia, wrote in the report. “From 2000 through 2016, death rates increased significantly for both men and women, with the death rate for men between two and two and a half times the rate for women.”

Among adults aged 25 years and older, liver cancer mortality increased 43% from 7.2 per 100,000 standard U.S. population in 2000 to 10.3 per 100,000 in 2016. Specifically, rates increased by 43% for men and 40% for women.

Liver cancer mortality increased by 48% for white individuals, 43% for black individuals and 27% for Hispanic individuals. In contrast, mortality rates decreased by 22% for Asian and Pacific Islander individuals.

Liver cancer MRI

Xu reported that liver cancer rates remained stable for adults aged 25 years to 44 years. All adults aged 45 years and older had increased rates between 2000 and 2016, with adults aged 45 years to 54 years showing a decrease between 2012 and 2016. Adults aged 75 years and older had the highest liver cancer mortality rate over the time period of 35%.

Regionally, liver cancer mortality rates were highest in Washington, D.C. (16.8 per 100,000), Louisiana (13.8 per 100,000), Hawaii (12.7 per 100,000) and New Mexico (12.4 per 100,000); whereas the lowest rates were in Vermont (6 per 100,000), Maine (7.4 per 100,000), Montana (7.7 per 100,000) and Utah and Nebraska (each 7.8 per 100,000).

For more recent data on liver cancer risks and novel methods of detection, read more Healio reports from 2017 and 2018.

Reference : Xu JQ. Trends in liver cancer mortality among adults aged 25 and over in the United States, 2000–2016. NCHS Data Brief, no 314. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. Available at https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/products/databriefs/db314.htm. Accessed July 18, 2018.

Disclosure: Healio was unable to confirm Xu’s relevant financial disclosures prior to publication.