Meeting News Coverage

Clinical, economic burdens of HCV remain after failed DAA therapy

The economic and clinical impact of hepatitis C in patients who did not achieve sustained virologic response totals more than 40,000 euros, according to a presentation at the 2016 EASL Special Conference: New Perspectives in Hepatitis C Virus Infection.

“[These] data suggest that, despite achieving or not the SVR, patients treated in the severe liver disease stage will remain with important clinical sequels and high economic burden,” Loreta A. Kondili MD, PhD, in the department of therapeutic research and medicines evaluation at Istituto Superiore di Sanità in Rome, told Healio.com/Hepatology.

Loreta Kondili
Loreta A. Kondili

Kondili and colleagues focused their efforts on 130 patients who failed to achieve SVR from an original cohort of 4,023 patients with HCV. Of the 130, 34% received a second round of direct-acting antivirals. After initial DAA failure, 125 had cirrhosis; the remaining five were treated for mixed cryoglobulinemia syndrome in F2 fibrosis. Three percent had HCV return after a liver transplant; 11.5% had hepatocellular carcinoma; LT was needed in one patient; and 17% were hospitalized. Researchers noted 740 outpatient visits and 320 diagnostic or therapeutic procedures.

The economic impact — in terms of loss of productivity and disease management — to patients averages around 43,000 euros per patient, Kondili said. Treatment for possible adverse events during DAA therapy, concomitant medications and DAA costs were not included in the estimate, she added.

Considering the high number of patients who would need treatment worldwide and the high economic burden of the disease management in advanced liver disease stage, important considerations need to be highlighted: One, treatment of patients in lower liver fibrosis stage and two, use of the most appropriate treatment in order to minimize the weight of the treatment failure,” Kondili told Healio.com/Hepatology. – by Janel Miller

Reference:

Kondili, LA, et al. Abstract #144. Presented at: EASL Special Conference: New Perspectives in Hepatitis C Virus Infection — The Roadmap for Cure; Sept. 23-24, 2016; Paris.

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

The economic and clinical impact of hepatitis C in patients who did not achieve sustained virologic response totals more than 40,000 euros, according to a presentation at the 2016 EASL Special Conference: New Perspectives in Hepatitis C Virus Infection.

“[These] data suggest that, despite achieving or not the SVR, patients treated in the severe liver disease stage will remain with important clinical sequels and high economic burden,” Loreta A. Kondili MD, PhD, in the department of therapeutic research and medicines evaluation at Istituto Superiore di Sanità in Rome, told Healio.com/Hepatology.

Loreta Kondili
Loreta A. Kondili

Kondili and colleagues focused their efforts on 130 patients who failed to achieve SVR from an original cohort of 4,023 patients with HCV. Of the 130, 34% received a second round of direct-acting antivirals. After initial DAA failure, 125 had cirrhosis; the remaining five were treated for mixed cryoglobulinemia syndrome in F2 fibrosis. Three percent had HCV return after a liver transplant; 11.5% had hepatocellular carcinoma; LT was needed in one patient; and 17% were hospitalized. Researchers noted 740 outpatient visits and 320 diagnostic or therapeutic procedures.

The economic impact — in terms of loss of productivity and disease management — to patients averages around 43,000 euros per patient, Kondili said. Treatment for possible adverse events during DAA therapy, concomitant medications and DAA costs were not included in the estimate, she added.

Considering the high number of patients who would need treatment worldwide and the high economic burden of the disease management in advanced liver disease stage, important considerations need to be highlighted: One, treatment of patients in lower liver fibrosis stage and two, use of the most appropriate treatment in order to minimize the weight of the treatment failure,” Kondili told Healio.com/Hepatology. – by Janel Miller

Reference:

Kondili, LA, et al. Abstract #144. Presented at: EASL Special Conference: New Perspectives in Hepatitis C Virus Infection — The Roadmap for Cure; Sept. 23-24, 2016; Paris.

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.