Meeting News Coverage

HCV not Associated With Increase in HIV Viral Load Among Adults With HIV

HCV was not associated with an increase in HIV viral load among adults with HIV, according to data from a systematic review presented at AIDS 2016.

“Much to our surprise, the limited data that are available suggest that HCV infection does not increase HIV viral load,” Judith N. Wasserheit, MD, MPH, professor of global health and medicine at the University of Washington, told Healio.com/Hepatology. “This finding opens the door to better understanding a critical issue in HIV prevention and care: Why and how different coinfections affect HIV transmission and progression.”

Judith N. Wasserheit, MD, MPH

Judith N. Wasserheit

Wasserheit and colleagues performed a random-effects meta-analysis and systematic review of 16 studies, 14 of which compared HIV viral load between coinfected and mono-infected patients and two of which compared viral load between HCV treated and untreated individuals.

Only four studies found an association (P < .05) between coinfection and HIV viral load, all of which showed a higher viral load among mono-infected patients. The meta-analysis showed no association between viral load and coinfection or treatment.

Jennifer Ross, MD, MPH

Jennifer Ross

“This issue is relevant for a public health official deciding whether to provide HCV therapy for groups of people coinfected with HIV and HCV to help control HIV infection, as well as HCV infection, particularly in regions where people lack access to antiretrovirals for HIV treatment,” Jennifer Ross, MD, MPH, from the division of infectious disease at the University of Washington, told Healio.com/Hepatology. “This finding warrants additional investigation by laboratory scientists.” – by Will Offit

Reference:

Ross J, et al. Abstract 104. Presented at: AIDS 2016; July 18-22, 2016; Durban, South Africa.

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

HCV was not associated with an increase in HIV viral load among adults with HIV, according to data from a systematic review presented at AIDS 2016.

“Much to our surprise, the limited data that are available suggest that HCV infection does not increase HIV viral load,” Judith N. Wasserheit, MD, MPH, professor of global health and medicine at the University of Washington, told Healio.com/Hepatology. “This finding opens the door to better understanding a critical issue in HIV prevention and care: Why and how different coinfections affect HIV transmission and progression.”

Judith N. Wasserheit, MD, MPH

Judith N. Wasserheit

Wasserheit and colleagues performed a random-effects meta-analysis and systematic review of 16 studies, 14 of which compared HIV viral load between coinfected and mono-infected patients and two of which compared viral load between HCV treated and untreated individuals.

Only four studies found an association (P < .05) between coinfection and HIV viral load, all of which showed a higher viral load among mono-infected patients. The meta-analysis showed no association between viral load and coinfection or treatment.

Jennifer Ross, MD, MPH

Jennifer Ross

“This issue is relevant for a public health official deciding whether to provide HCV therapy for groups of people coinfected with HIV and HCV to help control HIV infection, as well as HCV infection, particularly in regions where people lack access to antiretrovirals for HIV treatment,” Jennifer Ross, MD, MPH, from the division of infectious disease at the University of Washington, told Healio.com/Hepatology. “This finding warrants additional investigation by laboratory scientists.” – by Will Offit

Reference:

Ross J, et al. Abstract 104. Presented at: AIDS 2016; July 18-22, 2016; Durban, South Africa.

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

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