Meeting NewsVideo

Patient-reported outcomes improve after HCV clearance, regardless of cirrhosis

PARIS —Chairman of the department of medicine at Inova Fairfax Hospital, Virginia, Zobair M. Younossi, MD, discusses results of two studies on patient-reported outcomes among patients with hepatitis C in this exclusive interview from the International Liver Congress 2018.

The first study, which focused on patient-reported outcomes among individuals with HCV and cirrhosis, showed that quality of life and other patient-reported outcomes improved after sustained virologic response from treatment. Younossi and colleagues observed similar response regardless of whether cirrhosis was compensated or decompensated.

Multivariate analysis showed that younger age, the absence of baseline decompensation and type 2 diabetes, and baseline history of depression and fatigue independently predicted greater patient-reported outcome improvements in the long term (P < .05).In the second study, Younossi and colleagues analyzed the improvement of fatigue in patients with HCV after treatment. Results showed that more than half of the patients still reported components of fatigue after SVR.

The independent predictors for severe fatigue after SVR included the presence of cirrhosis (OR = 1.38; 95% CI, 1.1-1.73), history of depression (OR = 2.07; 95% CI, 1.66-2.58), sleep disorders (OR = 1.52; 95% CI, 1.2-1.92), and HIV coinfection (OR = 1.63; 95% CI, 1.06-2.51).

For more information:

Younossi ZM, et al. FRI-373. Presented at: International Liver Congress; Apr. 11-15; 2018; Paris, France.

Younossi ZM, et al. FRI-374. Presented at: International Liver Congress; Apr. 11-15, 2018; Paris, France.

Disclosure: Younossi reports no relevant financial disclosures.

PARIS —Chairman of the department of medicine at Inova Fairfax Hospital, Virginia, Zobair M. Younossi, MD, discusses results of two studies on patient-reported outcomes among patients with hepatitis C in this exclusive interview from the International Liver Congress 2018.

The first study, which focused on patient-reported outcomes among individuals with HCV and cirrhosis, showed that quality of life and other patient-reported outcomes improved after sustained virologic response from treatment. Younossi and colleagues observed similar response regardless of whether cirrhosis was compensated or decompensated.

Multivariate analysis showed that younger age, the absence of baseline decompensation and type 2 diabetes, and baseline history of depression and fatigue independently predicted greater patient-reported outcome improvements in the long term (P < .05).In the second study, Younossi and colleagues analyzed the improvement of fatigue in patients with HCV after treatment. Results showed that more than half of the patients still reported components of fatigue after SVR.

The independent predictors for severe fatigue after SVR included the presence of cirrhosis (OR = 1.38; 95% CI, 1.1-1.73), history of depression (OR = 2.07; 95% CI, 1.66-2.58), sleep disorders (OR = 1.52; 95% CI, 1.2-1.92), and HIV coinfection (OR = 1.63; 95% CI, 1.06-2.51).

For more information:

Younossi ZM, et al. FRI-373. Presented at: International Liver Congress; Apr. 11-15; 2018; Paris, France.

Younossi ZM, et al. FRI-374. Presented at: International Liver Congress; Apr. 11-15, 2018; Paris, France.

Disclosure: Younossi reports no relevant financial disclosures.

    See more from International Liver Congress