In the Journals

Antiviral therapy effective in patients with HCV, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

Antiviral therapy was effective in patients with hepatitis C virus infection-associated B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and produced sustained virologic response rates over 70%, according to results of a meta-analysis.

“Looking at all HCV–[non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma] patients treated with [antiviral therapy], the present meta-analysis demonstrated a good overall lymphoma response rate through the application of [antiviral therapy] in the setting of HCV–[non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma],” the researchers wrote.

Researchers evaluated 20 studies found in multiple databases focused on the efficacy of antiviral therapy among 254 patients with HCV and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

The overall lymphoma response rate through antiviral therapy was 73% (95% CI, 67–78).

Eighteen studies were evaluated to determine any association between antiviral therapy and HCV–non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. The researchers observed a strong association between sustained virologic response and lymphoma response (83%; 95% CI, 76–88) compared with failed SVR (53%; 95% CI, 39–67; P = .0002).

In addition, researchers observed a trend toward positive response for antiviral therapy in HCV-associated marginal zone lymphomas (81%; 95% CI, 74–87) compared with nonmarginal zone origin (71%; 95% CI, 61–79; P = .07).

“The strong correlation of SVR and lymphoma regression supports the hypothesis of a causal relationship of HCV and lymphomagenesis,” the researchers wrote.

The researchers concluded: “The overall response rate of HCV–[non-Hodgkin lymphomas] under [antiviral therapy] justifies the recommendation for [antiviral therapy] as first-line treatment in patients who do not need immediate conventional treatment.” – by Melinda Stevens

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

Antiviral therapy was effective in patients with hepatitis C virus infection-associated B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and produced sustained virologic response rates over 70%, according to results of a meta-analysis.

“Looking at all HCV–[non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma] patients treated with [antiviral therapy], the present meta-analysis demonstrated a good overall lymphoma response rate through the application of [antiviral therapy] in the setting of HCV–[non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma],” the researchers wrote.

Researchers evaluated 20 studies found in multiple databases focused on the efficacy of antiviral therapy among 254 patients with HCV and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

The overall lymphoma response rate through antiviral therapy was 73% (95% CI, 67–78).

Eighteen studies were evaluated to determine any association between antiviral therapy and HCV–non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. The researchers observed a strong association between sustained virologic response and lymphoma response (83%; 95% CI, 76–88) compared with failed SVR (53%; 95% CI, 39–67; P = .0002).

In addition, researchers observed a trend toward positive response for antiviral therapy in HCV-associated marginal zone lymphomas (81%; 95% CI, 74–87) compared with nonmarginal zone origin (71%; 95% CI, 61–79; P = .07).

“The strong correlation of SVR and lymphoma regression supports the hypothesis of a causal relationship of HCV and lymphomagenesis,” the researchers wrote.

The researchers concluded: “The overall response rate of HCV–[non-Hodgkin lymphomas] under [antiviral therapy] justifies the recommendation for [antiviral therapy] as first-line treatment in patients who do not need immediate conventional treatment.” – by Melinda Stevens

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.