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VIDEO: Shorter duration Mavyret safe, effective in all HCV genotypes

BOSTON — In this exclusive video from The Liver Meeting 2019, Robert S. Brown Jr., MD, MPH, of Weill Cornell Medical College, discusses the results of the EXPEDITION-8 trial, which demonstrated that treatment with Mavyret over 8 weeks was effective and had a favorable safety profile in patients with treatment-naive chronic hepatitis C virus genotypes 1-6 and compensated cirrhosis.

“We know we have a plethora of medications to choose [from] with hepatitis C, but the new recommendations from our organizations are to choose a pangenotypic therapy that is safe and effective,” Brown told Healio Gastroenterology and Liver Disease. “Having a simple regimen is also critical if we’re going to achieve the WHO goals of HCV elimination by 2030.”

The majority (97.7%, n = 335/343) of patients with genotypes 1-6 in the intent-to-treat population achieved SVR12 with glecaprevir/pibrentasvir (Mavyret, AbbVie).

More than half (63%) of the reported adverse events were grade 1 in severity. The most commonly reported side effects included fatigue (9%), pruritus (8%) and headache (8%).

“This allows us to treat all of our patients regardless of fibrosis stage with a shorter 8-week regimen,” he said. “Of course, it’s important to remember that glecaprevir/pibrentasvir is only approved for use in patients with compensated cirrhosis. It is contraindicated in moderate-to-severe hepatic impairment.”

Reference: Brown RS. LP9. Presented at: The Liver Meeting; Nov. 7-12, 2019; Boston.

Disclosure: Brown reports serving as a consultant for AbbVie, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Dova, Gilead, Intercept, Merck and Shionogi. Brown also reports receiving grant/research support from AbbVie, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Gilead, Intercept and Merck.

BOSTON — In this exclusive video from The Liver Meeting 2019, Robert S. Brown Jr., MD, MPH, of Weill Cornell Medical College, discusses the results of the EXPEDITION-8 trial, which demonstrated that treatment with Mavyret over 8 weeks was effective and had a favorable safety profile in patients with treatment-naive chronic hepatitis C virus genotypes 1-6 and compensated cirrhosis.

“We know we have a plethora of medications to choose [from] with hepatitis C, but the new recommendations from our organizations are to choose a pangenotypic therapy that is safe and effective,” Brown told Healio Gastroenterology and Liver Disease. “Having a simple regimen is also critical if we’re going to achieve the WHO goals of HCV elimination by 2030.”

The majority (97.7%, n = 335/343) of patients with genotypes 1-6 in the intent-to-treat population achieved SVR12 with glecaprevir/pibrentasvir (Mavyret, AbbVie).

More than half (63%) of the reported adverse events were grade 1 in severity. The most commonly reported side effects included fatigue (9%), pruritus (8%) and headache (8%).

“This allows us to treat all of our patients regardless of fibrosis stage with a shorter 8-week regimen,” he said. “Of course, it’s important to remember that glecaprevir/pibrentasvir is only approved for use in patients with compensated cirrhosis. It is contraindicated in moderate-to-severe hepatic impairment.”

Reference: Brown RS. LP9. Presented at: The Liver Meeting; Nov. 7-12, 2019; Boston.

Disclosure: Brown reports serving as a consultant for AbbVie, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Dova, Gilead, Intercept, Merck and Shionogi. Brown also reports receiving grant/research support from AbbVie, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Gilead, Intercept and Merck.

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