Meeting News Coverage

Thrombocytopenia common among Romanian patients with HCV

NEW YORK — Thrombocytopenia had a high prevalence among Romanian patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection, according to data presented at the AASLD/EASL Special Conference on Hepatitis C.

Researchers evaluated 1,615 patients (mean age, 53.4 years; 55.3% male) with chronic HCV who were previously surveyed at a clinic in Romania between 2010 and 2013 to determine the presence of thrombocytopenia. Thirty-eight percent of patients received antiviral therapy, and 16.3% were coinfected with HBV, with or without HDV. Researchers analyzed platelet counts below the following thresholds to determine thrombocytopenia prevalence: 50,000 platelets per mcL, 75,000 per mcL, 90,000 mcL and 150,000 per mcL.

As the threshold increased, thrombocytopenia prevalence increased; thrombocytopenia was prevalent in 5.1% of patients at the lowest threshold vs. 29.2% at the highest threshold measured.

Thrombocytopenia prevalence ranged from 7.3% to 52.1% of patients during antiviral treatment and declined after treatment was completed (range: 3.4%-18.6%). Researchers found thrombocytopenia to be more prevalent among HCV patients coinfected with HBV who actively consumed alcohol and among those with decompensated liver disease.

“This study demonstrates the high prevalence of thrombocytopenia among Romanian patients with HCV infection and due to the size of the study we can estimate also its prevalence during antiviral treatment which still influences the therapy decisions and the rate of sustained virologic response,” the researchers wrote.

For more information:

Trifan A. Abstract #50. Presented at: AASLD/EASL Special Conference on Hepatitis C, Sept. 12-13, 2014; New York.

Disclosures: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

NEW YORK — Thrombocytopenia had a high prevalence among Romanian patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection, according to data presented at the AASLD/EASL Special Conference on Hepatitis C.

Researchers evaluated 1,615 patients (mean age, 53.4 years; 55.3% male) with chronic HCV who were previously surveyed at a clinic in Romania between 2010 and 2013 to determine the presence of thrombocytopenia. Thirty-eight percent of patients received antiviral therapy, and 16.3% were coinfected with HBV, with or without HDV. Researchers analyzed platelet counts below the following thresholds to determine thrombocytopenia prevalence: 50,000 platelets per mcL, 75,000 per mcL, 90,000 mcL and 150,000 per mcL.

As the threshold increased, thrombocytopenia prevalence increased; thrombocytopenia was prevalent in 5.1% of patients at the lowest threshold vs. 29.2% at the highest threshold measured.

Thrombocytopenia prevalence ranged from 7.3% to 52.1% of patients during antiviral treatment and declined after treatment was completed (range: 3.4%-18.6%). Researchers found thrombocytopenia to be more prevalent among HCV patients coinfected with HBV who actively consumed alcohol and among those with decompensated liver disease.

“This study demonstrates the high prevalence of thrombocytopenia among Romanian patients with HCV infection and due to the size of the study we can estimate also its prevalence during antiviral treatment which still influences the therapy decisions and the rate of sustained virologic response,” the researchers wrote.

For more information:

Trifan A. Abstract #50. Presented at: AASLD/EASL Special Conference on Hepatitis C, Sept. 12-13, 2014; New York.

Disclosures: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.