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VIDEO: Neighborhood variables associated with prostate cancer aggressiveness

NEW ORLEANS — Neighborhood poverty level and mode of transportation to work appeared associated with disease aggressiveness among patients with prostate cancer, according to findings Shannon Lynch, PhD, MPH, assistant professor at Fox Chase Cancer Center, presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting.

Lynch and colleagues conducted a neighborhood-wide association study (NWAS) an empirical data-mining approach that uses publically available social datasets to identify neighborhood factors that are related to prostate cancer in white men.

The researchers computed associations between genetics and social data in 7,000 patients with prostate cancer vs. 70,000 controls in Pennsylvania. They identified 17 neighborhood variables that were most significantly associated with advanced disease.

Lynch said she would like to conduct similar studies in other states and across other racial groups.

“Development of the NWAS is particularly timely given the Precision Medicine Initiative, to focus not only on genes and lifestyle but environment,” Lynch told HemOnc Today.

NEW ORLEANS — Neighborhood poverty level and mode of transportation to work appeared associated with disease aggressiveness among patients with prostate cancer, according to findings Shannon Lynch, PhD, MPH, assistant professor at Fox Chase Cancer Center, presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting.

Lynch and colleagues conducted a neighborhood-wide association study (NWAS) an empirical data-mining approach that uses publically available social datasets to identify neighborhood factors that are related to prostate cancer in white men.

The researchers computed associations between genetics and social data in 7,000 patients with prostate cancer vs. 70,000 controls in Pennsylvania. They identified 17 neighborhood variables that were most significantly associated with advanced disease.

Lynch said she would like to conduct similar studies in other states and across other racial groups.

“Development of the NWAS is particularly timely given the Precision Medicine Initiative, to focus not only on genes and lifestyle but environment,” Lynch told HemOnc Today.

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