Trump administration committed to battling opioid crisis

President Donald J. Trump
Donald J. Trump

Today in Bedminster, NJ, President Donald J. Trump held a “major briefing” with the HHS on the current opioid epidemic in the United States and the department’s strategy to fight it. 

During a separate press briefing, HHS Secretary Tom Price, MD, emphasized the president’s absolute commitment to “turning this tide in the right direction” and ensuring that the number of overdose deaths and individuals addicted to medication decrease.

Price noted that in 2015, there were approximately 52,000 overdose deaths, of which 33,000 were related to opioids.

“The numbers in 2016 are no better and the numbers in 2017 are worse than in 2016,” he said.

He outlined the HHS’s strategy for combatting the opioid epidemic, which includes ensuring that necessary resources and information for prevention, treatment and recovery are readily accessible; that best practices are provided for states engaged in the process; and that overdose-reversing medication is widely available across the country. Price also highlighted the importance of identifying why so many Americans succumb to overdose death and why those numbers continue to rise.

The NIH is an important factor for research and developing pain medications that are not addictive or euphoric, he said.

“[The NIH] is working on a vaccine for addiction,” Price said. “That is incredibly exciting.”

Furthermore, understanding how to treat pain in this nation and providing pain medication “when necessary, but no more than necessary” is essential, he added.

KellyAnne Conway, the president’s senior counselor, also attended the briefing with President Trump. Conway and Price underscored the importance of working together in a comprehensive strategy.

“The problem is very complicated and currently we are on the losing side of this war,” Conway said during the press conference. “With the President’s leadership and the First Lady’s involvement and involvement across a spectrum of different cabinets and agencies and different departments in the West Wing, we are confident that we can help those in need across this country. We know this involves public health, the medical community, health care delivery system, law enforcement, education, local and state-wide elected officials, devastated families and those in treatment and recovery.”

“No state has been spared and no demographic group has gone untouched,” she added. “It is not a problem of young or old, of black or white, of rural, urban or suburban. It really has affected all of our communities in varying degrees.”

Healio has provided extensive coverage of research developments and policy guidelines as the health care industry struggles to deal with the opioid epidemic.by Alaina Tedesco

Opioid dose reduction may benefit patients with chronic pain

Reducing or discontinuing long-term opioid therapy may improve pain, function and quality of life among patients with chronic pain; however, these findings are supported by very low-quality evidence, according to a review published in Annals of Internal Medicine. Read more.

CDC releases opioid prescription guidelines for primary care physicians

The CDC has released guidelines for primary care physicians prescribing opioids for chronic pain, calling it an “urgent response to the epidemic of overdose deaths” across the nation. Read more.

FDA warns against combining opioids and benzodiazepines

The FDA has issued a warning regarding the combined use of opioids and benzodiazepines, which may result in serious adverse effects such as difficult or slowed breathing and death, according to a press release from the agency. Read more.

Buprenorphine underutilized despite benefits for treating opioid addiction

Although buprenorphine can play a critical role in fighting the opioid epidemic, not enough physicians are prescribing the medication and many are not willing to increase their use of it, according to a presentation at the 125th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association. Read more.

One in eight adult opioid users in the US reported misuse, abuse

In 2015, more than 12% of the 91.8 million adults in the United States using prescription opioids reported misusing them or noted they had a use disorder. These findings highlight a need for medical-based interventions and stricter adherence to opioid-prescribing guidelines to reduce the opioid crisis, according to survey results published in Annals of Internal Medicine. Read more.

HHS awards $485 million to combat opioid crisis

HHS recently announced that it will soon administer grants totaling $485 million to all 50 states, Washington, D.C, four U.S. territories and the free associated states of Palau and Micronesia to combat opioid addiction, according to a press release. Read more.

FDA approves drug for emergency treatment of known or suspected opioid overdoses

The FDA has approved the 2-mg dosage of nasal spray Narcan for ready-to-use emergency treatments of suspected or known opioid overdose, including prescription opioid painkiller-, fentanyl-, carfentanil- and heroin-related overdose in patients who are dependent on opioids, according to Adapt Pharma Inc., the nasal spray’s manufacturer. Read more.

FDA approves supplemental new drug application for opioid dependence agent Bunavail

The FDA has approved a supplemental new drug application for Bunavail, a bi-layer buccal film that helps treat opioid dependence, according to a statement from its manufacturer. Read more.

Physician prescribing patterns may help determine risk for long-term opioid use

Patients treated in the ED by physicians who prescribe opioids at a higher intensity are at greater risk for long-term opioid use than those who see low-intensity prescribers, according to a study that recently appeared in the New England Journal of Medicine. Read more.

Risk for chronic opioid use can be triggered in as little as three days

The likelihood of chronic opioid use in patients increased with each additional day of medication supplied starting with the third day and saw sharper increases as time went on, according to research recently published in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Read more.

 

President Donald J. Trump
Donald J. Trump

Today in Bedminster, NJ, President Donald J. Trump held a “major briefing” with the HHS on the current opioid epidemic in the United States and the department’s strategy to fight it. 

During a separate press briefing, HHS Secretary Tom Price, MD, emphasized the president’s absolute commitment to “turning this tide in the right direction” and ensuring that the number of overdose deaths and individuals addicted to medication decrease.

Price noted that in 2015, there were approximately 52,000 overdose deaths, of which 33,000 were related to opioids.

“The numbers in 2016 are no better and the numbers in 2017 are worse than in 2016,” he said.

He outlined the HHS’s strategy for combatting the opioid epidemic, which includes ensuring that necessary resources and information for prevention, treatment and recovery are readily accessible; that best practices are provided for states engaged in the process; and that overdose-reversing medication is widely available across the country. Price also highlighted the importance of identifying why so many Americans succumb to overdose death and why those numbers continue to rise.

The NIH is an important factor for research and developing pain medications that are not addictive or euphoric, he said.

“[The NIH] is working on a vaccine for addiction,” Price said. “That is incredibly exciting.”

Furthermore, understanding how to treat pain in this nation and providing pain medication “when necessary, but no more than necessary” is essential, he added.

KellyAnne Conway, the president’s senior counselor, also attended the briefing with President Trump. Conway and Price underscored the importance of working together in a comprehensive strategy.

“The problem is very complicated and currently we are on the losing side of this war,” Conway said during the press conference. “With the President’s leadership and the First Lady’s involvement and involvement across a spectrum of different cabinets and agencies and different departments in the West Wing, we are confident that we can help those in need across this country. We know this involves public health, the medical community, health care delivery system, law enforcement, education, local and state-wide elected officials, devastated families and those in treatment and recovery.”

“No state has been spared and no demographic group has gone untouched,” she added. “It is not a problem of young or old, of black or white, of rural, urban or suburban. It really has affected all of our communities in varying degrees.”

Healio has provided extensive coverage of research developments and policy guidelines as the health care industry struggles to deal with the opioid epidemic.by Alaina Tedesco

Opioid dose reduction may benefit patients with chronic pain

Reducing or discontinuing long-term opioid therapy may improve pain, function and quality of life among patients with chronic pain; however, these findings are supported by very low-quality evidence, according to a review published in Annals of Internal Medicine. Read more.

CDC releases opioid prescription guidelines for primary care physicians

The CDC has released guidelines for primary care physicians prescribing opioids for chronic pain, calling it an “urgent response to the epidemic of overdose deaths” across the nation. Read more.

FDA warns against combining opioids and benzodiazepines

The FDA has issued a warning regarding the combined use of opioids and benzodiazepines, which may result in serious adverse effects such as difficult or slowed breathing and death, according to a press release from the agency. Read more.

Buprenorphine underutilized despite benefits for treating opioid addiction

Although buprenorphine can play a critical role in fighting the opioid epidemic, not enough physicians are prescribing the medication and many are not willing to increase their use of it, according to a presentation at the 125th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association. Read more.

One in eight adult opioid users in the US reported misuse, abuse

In 2015, more than 12% of the 91.8 million adults in the United States using prescription opioids reported misusing them or noted they had a use disorder. These findings highlight a need for medical-based interventions and stricter adherence to opioid-prescribing guidelines to reduce the opioid crisis, according to survey results published in Annals of Internal Medicine. Read more.

HHS awards $485 million to combat opioid crisis

HHS recently announced that it will soon administer grants totaling $485 million to all 50 states, Washington, D.C, four U.S. territories and the free associated states of Palau and Micronesia to combat opioid addiction, according to a press release. Read more.

FDA approves drug for emergency treatment of known or suspected opioid overdoses

The FDA has approved the 2-mg dosage of nasal spray Narcan for ready-to-use emergency treatments of suspected or known opioid overdose, including prescription opioid painkiller-, fentanyl-, carfentanil- and heroin-related overdose in patients who are dependent on opioids, according to Adapt Pharma Inc., the nasal spray’s manufacturer. Read more.

FDA approves supplemental new drug application for opioid dependence agent Bunavail

The FDA has approved a supplemental new drug application for Bunavail, a bi-layer buccal film that helps treat opioid dependence, according to a statement from its manufacturer. Read more.

Physician prescribing patterns may help determine risk for long-term opioid use

Patients treated in the ED by physicians who prescribe opioids at a higher intensity are at greater risk for long-term opioid use than those who see low-intensity prescribers, according to a study that recently appeared in the New England Journal of Medicine. Read more.

Risk for chronic opioid use can be triggered in as little as three days

The likelihood of chronic opioid use in patients increased with each additional day of medication supplied starting with the third day and saw sharper increases as time went on, according to research recently published in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Read more.