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VIDEO: Immunotherapy research only at ‘tip of the iceberg’

NEW YORK — Jason J. Luke, MD, FACP, assistant professor of medicine at The University of Chicago Medicine, discussed the future of immunotherapies for the treatment of melanoma and other cancers at HemOnc Today Melanoma and Cutaneous Malignancies.

“We are really excited about the advancements that have been made with anti–PD-1 and anti–CTLA4 antibodies; however, we really think [the advances are] just the tip of the iceberg both for melanoma and across all cancers,” Luke said.

Despite these immuno-oncology targets, Luke said more research is needed for clinicians to be able to understand all factors that can affect a patient’s response to immunotherapies. For instance, different hypotheses about how to augment response include targeting tumor mutations, trying to harness the germline genome of a patient’s natural immunity and modulating the tumor by the microbiome.

“Through all of these approaches, we think the future will be a multi-dimensional biomarker analysis that helps to tell us which patients can just get one drug with anti–PD-1 and which will need combinations as we move into an indefinite future of immuno-oncology,” Luke said.

Disclosures: Luke reports consultant roles with Amgen, Array, AstraZeneca, BeneVir, Bristol-Myers Squibb, CheckMate, EMD Serono, Gilead Sciences, Novartis and Merck (non-paid), and institutional support from AbbVie, Boston Biomedical, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Celldex, Corvus, Delcath, Five Prime, Genentech, Immunocore, Incyte, MedImmune, Macrogenics, Novartis, Pharmacyclics, Merck and Tesaro.

NEW YORK — Jason J. Luke, MD, FACP, assistant professor of medicine at The University of Chicago Medicine, discussed the future of immunotherapies for the treatment of melanoma and other cancers at HemOnc Today Melanoma and Cutaneous Malignancies.

“We are really excited about the advancements that have been made with anti–PD-1 and anti–CTLA4 antibodies; however, we really think [the advances are] just the tip of the iceberg both for melanoma and across all cancers,” Luke said.

Despite these immuno-oncology targets, Luke said more research is needed for clinicians to be able to understand all factors that can affect a patient’s response to immunotherapies. For instance, different hypotheses about how to augment response include targeting tumor mutations, trying to harness the germline genome of a patient’s natural immunity and modulating the tumor by the microbiome.

“Through all of these approaches, we think the future will be a multi-dimensional biomarker analysis that helps to tell us which patients can just get one drug with anti–PD-1 and which will need combinations as we move into an indefinite future of immuno-oncology,” Luke said.

Disclosures: Luke reports consultant roles with Amgen, Array, AstraZeneca, BeneVir, Bristol-Myers Squibb, CheckMate, EMD Serono, Gilead Sciences, Novartis and Merck (non-paid), and institutional support from AbbVie, Boston Biomedical, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Celldex, Corvus, Delcath, Five Prime, Genentech, Immunocore, Incyte, MedImmune, Macrogenics, Novartis, Pharmacyclics, Merck and Tesaro.

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