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Age, preoperative size predicted subclinical spread of melanoma in situ treated with Mohs’ surgery

NEW YORK — In this video, Thuzar M. Shin, MD, PhD, presented data which indicated that a patient’s age and the preoperative size of lesions may help predict subclinical spread of melanoma in situ treated with Mohs’ micrographic surgery.

Shin and colleagues from the department of dermatology at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, aimed to create a prediction model for subclinical spread of melanoma in situ by assessing the clinical and pathologic factors associated with the requirement for two or more stages of microscopic clearance by Mohs’ micrographic surgery.

Results of univariate analysis showed age, preoperative size, recurrent status and lesion location on the head and neck were associated with a higher likelihood of needing two or more stages of MMS to obtain tumor-free margins. More than half (53%) of patients with recurrent lesions required two or more MMS stages to obtain tumor-free margins compared with 28.5% of patients with primary lesions.

NEW YORK — In this video, Thuzar M. Shin, MD, PhD, presented data which indicated that a patient’s age and the preoperative size of lesions may help predict subclinical spread of melanoma in situ treated with Mohs’ micrographic surgery.

Shin and colleagues from the department of dermatology at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, aimed to create a prediction model for subclinical spread of melanoma in situ by assessing the clinical and pathologic factors associated with the requirement for two or more stages of microscopic clearance by Mohs’ micrographic surgery.

Results of univariate analysis showed age, preoperative size, recurrent status and lesion location on the head and neck were associated with a higher likelihood of needing two or more stages of MMS to obtain tumor-free margins. More than half (53%) of patients with recurrent lesions required two or more MMS stages to obtain tumor-free margins compared with 28.5% of patients with primary lesions.

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