Meeting News CoverageVideo

VIDEO: Combination immunotherapy may improve OS in metastatic melanoma

NEW YORK — Combination immunotherapy with CTLA-4 blockade plus anti–PD-1 inhibitors may effectively treat patients with metastatic melanoma, Steven J. O’Day, MD, director of immuno-oncology and clinical research at The John Wayne Cancer Institute, said at HemOnc Today Melanoma and Cutaneous Malignancies.

Efficacy data showed an improved overall response rate, disease control rate and PFS, and 70% of patients reached 3-year OS using the combination regimen.

“Overall, we will wait for the definitive results from the phase 3 trial to make a standard recommendation,” O’Day told HemOnc Today. “The data are evolving, but we’re very excited about the OS data with combination immunotherapy.”

O’Day also addressed the toxicity profile, which requires close management of patients.

“We have significant toxicity management issues to discuss and work with patients, and hopefully as things evolve, biomarkers will help us identify which patients truly need more aggressive therapy and which can get away with just monotherapy,” he added. “But, overall, the bar for melanoma is rising rapidly. It’s high already, and we’re anticipating it improving further in the coming years.”

NEW YORK — Combination immunotherapy with CTLA-4 blockade plus anti–PD-1 inhibitors may effectively treat patients with metastatic melanoma, Steven J. O’Day, MD, director of immuno-oncology and clinical research at The John Wayne Cancer Institute, said at HemOnc Today Melanoma and Cutaneous Malignancies.

Efficacy data showed an improved overall response rate, disease control rate and PFS, and 70% of patients reached 3-year OS using the combination regimen.

“Overall, we will wait for the definitive results from the phase 3 trial to make a standard recommendation,” O’Day told HemOnc Today. “The data are evolving, but we’re very excited about the OS data with combination immunotherapy.”

O’Day also addressed the toxicity profile, which requires close management of patients.

“We have significant toxicity management issues to discuss and work with patients, and hopefully as things evolve, biomarkers will help us identify which patients truly need more aggressive therapy and which can get away with just monotherapy,” he added. “But, overall, the bar for melanoma is rising rapidly. It’s high already, and we’re anticipating it improving further in the coming years.”

    See more from HemOnc Today New York