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VIDEO: ‘Drastic’ responses to active immunotherapy in Hodgkin’s lymphoma spur broader research

Joshua Brody, MD, director of the Lymphoma Immunotherapy Program, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York, discusses developments in using active immunotherapy to treat lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

In the second segment of a multi-part video interview, Brody details the automobile-like mechanisms of active immunotherapy that teach the immune system to eliminate cancer through “gas pedals,” “brake pedals” and “steering wheels.”

“The biggest advance in the past decade has been the drastic amount of data showing … we can block brake pedals with antibodies and allow immune cells that were already prepared to attack tumor cells to be free to do that.”

Brody highlights the promise of anti-PD-1 and anti-PD-L1 antibodies, targeting CD8 T-cells, in Hodgkin’s lymphoma specifically — putting response rates in context as “the most remarkable of any immunotherapy for any disease.”

He notes positive results are being witnessed in more common lymphomas and underscores further investigation is needed on combining immunotherapies with one another and with other therapies including kinase inhibitors.

Joshua Brody, MD, director of the Lymphoma Immunotherapy Program, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York, discusses developments in using active immunotherapy to treat lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

In the second segment of a multi-part video interview, Brody details the automobile-like mechanisms of active immunotherapy that teach the immune system to eliminate cancer through “gas pedals,” “brake pedals” and “steering wheels.”

“The biggest advance in the past decade has been the drastic amount of data showing … we can block brake pedals with antibodies and allow immune cells that were already prepared to attack tumor cells to be free to do that.”

Brody highlights the promise of anti-PD-1 and anti-PD-L1 antibodies, targeting CD8 T-cells, in Hodgkin’s lymphoma specifically — putting response rates in context as “the most remarkable of any immunotherapy for any disease.”

He notes positive results are being witnessed in more common lymphomas and underscores further investigation is needed on combining immunotherapies with one another and with other therapies including kinase inhibitors.

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