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VIDEO: Continuing immunotherapy after NSCLC progression is ‘individualized treatment decision’

NEW YORK — Benjamin P. Levy, MD, associate professor at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and clinical director of Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center at Sibley Memorial Hospital, spoke to attendees at HemOnc Today New York about salvage treatment options for patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

His presentation explored how to best manage patients whose disease progressed after platinum therapy or platinum plus immunotherapy.

He also addressed whether patients who are receiving immunotherapy and are doing well should continue to be treated if CT scans show disease progression.

“There are data that suggest there are meaningful improvements in survival by continuing immunotherapy beyond progression,” Levy told HemOnc Today. “But, in my mind, this is an individualized treatment decision that requires you to look at the patient’s scan, look at their comorbidities and look at the patients themselves to see if they are still deriving meaningful benefit. In my practice, they generally don’t.”

Disclosure: Levy reports serving as a consultant/advisory board member for AstraZeneca, Celgene, Eli Lilly, Genentech, Merck and Takeda, and receiving research funding from Boehringer Ingelheim and Celgene.

NEW YORK — Benjamin P. Levy, MD, associate professor at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and clinical director of Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center at Sibley Memorial Hospital, spoke to attendees at HemOnc Today New York about salvage treatment options for patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

His presentation explored how to best manage patients whose disease progressed after platinum therapy or platinum plus immunotherapy.

He also addressed whether patients who are receiving immunotherapy and are doing well should continue to be treated if CT scans show disease progression.

“There are data that suggest there are meaningful improvements in survival by continuing immunotherapy beyond progression,” Levy told HemOnc Today. “But, in my mind, this is an individualized treatment decision that requires you to look at the patient’s scan, look at their comorbidities and look at the patients themselves to see if they are still deriving meaningful benefit. In my practice, they generally don’t.”

Disclosure: Levy reports serving as a consultant/advisory board member for AstraZeneca, Celgene, Eli Lilly, Genentech, Merck and Takeda, and receiving research funding from Boehringer Ingelheim and Celgene.

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