Meeting NewsVideo

VIDEO: Serum protein changes indicate response to siltuximab in Castleman disease

ORLANDO — Researchers identified proteins that began to change within 8 days of initiating siltuximab in patients with idiopathic multicentric Castleman disease, a rare immune system disorder, according to a video interview at ASH Annual Meeting & Exposition.

David C. Fajgenbaum, MD, of the University of Pennsylvania and the Castleman Disease Collaborative Network, and colleagues examined serum proteomic changes disease to help clinicians indicate the patients who were likely to respond and those not likely to respond to siltuximab.

“It’s really important to make progress for Castleman disease, but we also realize this is an opportunity to make progress for other rare diseases more generally and as a model for rare disease research,” Fajgenbaum said.

Disclosure: Fajgenbaum reports research funding from Janssen Pharmaceuticals.

ORLANDO — Researchers identified proteins that began to change within 8 days of initiating siltuximab in patients with idiopathic multicentric Castleman disease, a rare immune system disorder, according to a video interview at ASH Annual Meeting & Exposition.

David C. Fajgenbaum, MD, of the University of Pennsylvania and the Castleman Disease Collaborative Network, and colleagues examined serum proteomic changes disease to help clinicians indicate the patients who were likely to respond and those not likely to respond to siltuximab.

“It’s really important to make progress for Castleman disease, but we also realize this is an opportunity to make progress for other rare diseases more generally and as a model for rare disease research,” Fajgenbaum said.

Disclosure: Fajgenbaum reports research funding from Janssen Pharmaceuticals.

    See more from Discoveries from ASH: Benign Hematology