ASH presents bridge grants to 19 investigators

Photo of Roy Silverstein
Roy L. Silverstein

ASH awarded $150,000 each to 19 investigators through the society’s bridge grant program, designed to sustain promising hematologic research proposals that are not funded through NIH.

The grants serve as a 1-yaer bridge for investigators with NIH-scored but nonfunded R01 grants.

“We are in an exciting era for hematology, with the emergence of cutting-edge gene and cell therapies and treatments that are increasingly targeted to individual patient needs,” ASH President Roy L. Silverstein, MD, chairman of the department of medicine at Medical College of Wisconsin, said in a society-issued press release. “The ASH Bridge Grant Program is vital to advancing research underlying these and other innovative, life-saving therapies which we know have the potential to transform patient care and improve public health.”

ASH has presented more than $17 million in bridge grants to 134 investigators since the program’s inception in 2013.

This year’s grant recipients are Srividya Bhaskara, PhD, of The University of Utah; Renata Grozovsky, PhD, of Brigham and Women’s Hospital; Sarah Holstein, MD, PhD, of University of Nebraska Medical Center; Shawn Jobe, MD, of Blood Center of Wisconsin; Ya-Huei Kuo, PhD, of City of Hope; Kim Nichols, MD, of St. Jude Children's Research Hospital; Barbara Sherry, PhD, of The Feinstein Institute For Medical Research; Roland Walter, MD, PhD, of Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center; Karina Yazdanbakhsh, PhD, of New York Blood Center; Ravi Bhatia, MD, of The University of Alabama at Birmingham; Kevin Bunting, PhD, of Emory University; David Fruman, PhD, of University of California, Irvine; Niall Howlett, PhD, of University of Rhode Island; Zhi Liu, PhD, of Boston Children's Hospital; Troy Lund, MD, PhD, of University of Minnesota; Rinku Majumder, PhD, of LSU Health Science Center; Joel Pomerantz, PhD, of The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine; Yogen Saunthararajah, MD, of Cleveland Clinic; and Christopher Sturgeon, PhD, of Washington University School of Medicine.

Photo of Roy Silverstein
Roy L. Silverstein

ASH awarded $150,000 each to 19 investigators through the society’s bridge grant program, designed to sustain promising hematologic research proposals that are not funded through NIH.

The grants serve as a 1-yaer bridge for investigators with NIH-scored but nonfunded R01 grants.

“We are in an exciting era for hematology, with the emergence of cutting-edge gene and cell therapies and treatments that are increasingly targeted to individual patient needs,” ASH President Roy L. Silverstein, MD, chairman of the department of medicine at Medical College of Wisconsin, said in a society-issued press release. “The ASH Bridge Grant Program is vital to advancing research underlying these and other innovative, life-saving therapies which we know have the potential to transform patient care and improve public health.”

ASH has presented more than $17 million in bridge grants to 134 investigators since the program’s inception in 2013.

This year’s grant recipients are Srividya Bhaskara, PhD, of The University of Utah; Renata Grozovsky, PhD, of Brigham and Women’s Hospital; Sarah Holstein, MD, PhD, of University of Nebraska Medical Center; Shawn Jobe, MD, of Blood Center of Wisconsin; Ya-Huei Kuo, PhD, of City of Hope; Kim Nichols, MD, of St. Jude Children's Research Hospital; Barbara Sherry, PhD, of The Feinstein Institute For Medical Research; Roland Walter, MD, PhD, of Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center; Karina Yazdanbakhsh, PhD, of New York Blood Center; Ravi Bhatia, MD, of The University of Alabama at Birmingham; Kevin Bunting, PhD, of Emory University; David Fruman, PhD, of University of California, Irvine; Niall Howlett, PhD, of University of Rhode Island; Zhi Liu, PhD, of Boston Children's Hospital; Troy Lund, MD, PhD, of University of Minnesota; Rinku Majumder, PhD, of LSU Health Science Center; Joel Pomerantz, PhD, of The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine; Yogen Saunthararajah, MD, of Cleveland Clinic; and Christopher Sturgeon, PhD, of Washington University School of Medicine.