ASH presents bridge grants to nine investigators

ASH presented bridge grants to nine investigators.

The $150,000 grants will fund research proposals that, despite earning high scores, could not be funded by NIH due to limited funding.

Charles Abrams

Charles S. Abrams

The recipients are Jaehyung Cho, PhD, of University of Illinois-Chicago; Clark W. Distelhorst, MD, of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine; Siegfried Janz, MD, DSc, of University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine; Ann Mullally, MD, of Brigham and Women’s Hospital; Enrico Novelli, MD, of University of Pittsburgh; Samir Parekh, MD, of Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai; Zhijian Qian, PhD, of University of Illinois at Chicago; Matthew Riese, MD, PhD, of BloodCenter of Wisconsin; and Fenghuang Zhan, MD, PhD, of University of Iowa.

“The ASH bridge grants program encourages the retention of promising researchers in the field of hematology, prevents labs from closing and most importantly, ensures that research and discovery can continue,” ASH President Charles S. Abrams, MD, said in a press release. “When these pivotal research programs lack funding, progress and knowledge are forced to take a back seat, as scientists spend more time applying for alternative grants rather than conducting important research. It’s rewarding to know that we can foster scientific innovation in these times of financial uncertainty.”

ASH has presented bridge grants to 73 hematologists since the program’s inception in 2012.

“Because ASH has funded innovative research projects, we have seen so many wonderful developments in treating blood diseases and blood cancers in recent years,” Abrams said. “It is our hope that Washington’s recent willingness to work across the aisle continues with increased investment in the NIH. Such funding is paramount to ensuring that the end to blood cancers and blood disease are discovered in labs across the country, and that those who are dependent upon these cures will see them in their lifetimes.”

ASH presented bridge grants to nine investigators.

The $150,000 grants will fund research proposals that, despite earning high scores, could not be funded by NIH due to limited funding.

Charles Abrams

Charles S. Abrams

The recipients are Jaehyung Cho, PhD, of University of Illinois-Chicago; Clark W. Distelhorst, MD, of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine; Siegfried Janz, MD, DSc, of University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine; Ann Mullally, MD, of Brigham and Women’s Hospital; Enrico Novelli, MD, of University of Pittsburgh; Samir Parekh, MD, of Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai; Zhijian Qian, PhD, of University of Illinois at Chicago; Matthew Riese, MD, PhD, of BloodCenter of Wisconsin; and Fenghuang Zhan, MD, PhD, of University of Iowa.

“The ASH bridge grants program encourages the retention of promising researchers in the field of hematology, prevents labs from closing and most importantly, ensures that research and discovery can continue,” ASH President Charles S. Abrams, MD, said in a press release. “When these pivotal research programs lack funding, progress and knowledge are forced to take a back seat, as scientists spend more time applying for alternative grants rather than conducting important research. It’s rewarding to know that we can foster scientific innovation in these times of financial uncertainty.”

ASH has presented bridge grants to 73 hematologists since the program’s inception in 2012.

“Because ASH has funded innovative research projects, we have seen so many wonderful developments in treating blood diseases and blood cancers in recent years,” Abrams said. “It is our hope that Washington’s recent willingness to work across the aisle continues with increased investment in the NIH. Such funding is paramount to ensuring that the end to blood cancers and blood disease are discovered in labs across the country, and that those who are dependent upon these cures will see them in their lifetimes.”