Meeting News CoverageVideo

VIDEO: Combination therapy with PD-L1, PARP inhibitors appears effective in patients with ovarian, breast cancer

The use of durvalumab and olaparib in combination appeared safe and showed durable response in patients with recurrent ovarian and triple-negative breast cancer, according to research presented at the ASCO Annual Meeting.

In this video, Jung-Min Lee, MD, a principal investigator for the National Cancer Institute, discusses the results of a phase 1 clinical trial that evaluated the safety and efficacy of durvalumab (MEDI4736, AstraZeneca and MedImmune) in combination with olaparib (Lynparza, AstraZeneca) – as well as the combination of durvalumab and cediranib (AZD2171, AstraZeneca) – to treat women’s cancers.

“We found [that a daily-dose of cediranib] and durvalumab may not [be] well tolerable even if it shows promising early activity in gynecologic cancer patients,” Lee told HemOnc Today.

However, Lee mentions that further clinical trials will examine an intermittent cediranib schedule with 1500 mg of durvalumab every 28 days.

Lee also discusses how these initial results are exciting as the novel therapy approaches may be more effective than immunotherapy alone or a possible alternative to conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy.

“I’m… studying who is responding [and] who is not responding so that we [have] better ideas in terms of biomarkers, and further development of this exciting combination in clinical trials,” she said.

The use of durvalumab and olaparib in combination appeared safe and showed durable response in patients with recurrent ovarian and triple-negative breast cancer, according to research presented at the ASCO Annual Meeting.

In this video, Jung-Min Lee, MD, a principal investigator for the National Cancer Institute, discusses the results of a phase 1 clinical trial that evaluated the safety and efficacy of durvalumab (MEDI4736, AstraZeneca and MedImmune) in combination with olaparib (Lynparza, AstraZeneca) – as well as the combination of durvalumab and cediranib (AZD2171, AstraZeneca) – to treat women’s cancers.

“We found [that a daily-dose of cediranib] and durvalumab may not [be] well tolerable even if it shows promising early activity in gynecologic cancer patients,” Lee told HemOnc Today.

However, Lee mentions that further clinical trials will examine an intermittent cediranib schedule with 1500 mg of durvalumab every 28 days.

Lee also discusses how these initial results are exciting as the novel therapy approaches may be more effective than immunotherapy alone or a possible alternative to conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy.

“I’m… studying who is responding [and] who is not responding so that we [have] better ideas in terms of biomarkers, and further development of this exciting combination in clinical trials,” she said.

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