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VIDEO: Erdafitinib may be ‘viable option’ for subset of urothelial carcinoma

CHICAGO — Erdafitinib induced a robust response among patients with chemotherapy-refractory metastatic or unresectable urothelial carcinoma and FGFR alterations, according to results of a primary analysis presented at the ASCO Annual Meeting.

“This is an alteration that can be seen in various patients with metastatic urothelial cancer that we know is potentially targetable and may identify a reason why these cancers are progressing,” Matthew R. Zibelman, MD, a medical oncologist at Fox Chase Cancer Center, told HemOnc Today. “This is really the farthest-along drug looking at a targeted therapy for metastatic urothelial cancer at which point we don’t have a drug that does that.”

Zibelman, who co-chaired the session, said that the results were exciting and promising for multiple reasons.

“I think what was interesting ... about this abstract was the fact that about 22 patients had prior immunotherapy, very few of whom had responded to immunotherapy,” he said. “But a high percentage, almost 60%, responded to this drug, maybe starting to suggest that patients who have these FGFR mutations are less likely to respond to immunotherapy and this may turn out to be a viable option moving forward.”

Reference:

Seifker-Radtke, et al. Abstract 4503. Presented at: ASCO Annual Meeting; June 1-5, 2018; Chicago.

CHICAGO — Erdafitinib induced a robust response among patients with chemotherapy-refractory metastatic or unresectable urothelial carcinoma and FGFR alterations, according to results of a primary analysis presented at the ASCO Annual Meeting.

“This is an alteration that can be seen in various patients with metastatic urothelial cancer that we know is potentially targetable and may identify a reason why these cancers are progressing,” Matthew R. Zibelman, MD, a medical oncologist at Fox Chase Cancer Center, told HemOnc Today. “This is really the farthest-along drug looking at a targeted therapy for metastatic urothelial cancer at which point we don’t have a drug that does that.”

Zibelman, who co-chaired the session, said that the results were exciting and promising for multiple reasons.

“I think what was interesting ... about this abstract was the fact that about 22 patients had prior immunotherapy, very few of whom had responded to immunotherapy,” he said. “But a high percentage, almost 60%, responded to this drug, maybe starting to suggest that patients who have these FGFR mutations are less likely to respond to immunotherapy and this may turn out to be a viable option moving forward.”

Reference:

Seifker-Radtke, et al. Abstract 4503. Presented at: ASCO Annual Meeting; June 1-5, 2018; Chicago.

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