Research Center appoints director

Ben Z. Stanger, MD, PhD, associate professor of gastroenterology at Perelman School of Medicine at University of Pennsylvania, has been named director of the Penn Pancreatic Cancer Research Center.

Stanger — who previously served as the center’s scientific director — will succeed founding director Robert Vonderheide, MD, DPhil, who took over as director of Abramson Cancer Center.

Stanger served as instructor at Harvard Medical School from 2003 to 2006 before transitioning to Penn. His research focuses on efforts to understand the molecular and cellular mechanisms of cancer metastasis, specifically malignancies of the pancreas and liver.

The Penn Pancreatic Cancer Research Center team includes medical oncologists, surgeons, gastroenterologists, radiation oncologists, pathologists and radiologists. The team’s research efforts focus on understanding the molecular mechanisms of metastasis; barriers to effective use of immunotherapy for pancreatic cancer; and efforts to identify biomarkers for early-stage disease.

Ben Z. Stanger, MD, PhD, associate professor of gastroenterology at Perelman School of Medicine at University of Pennsylvania, has been named director of the Penn Pancreatic Cancer Research Center.

Stanger — who previously served as the center’s scientific director — will succeed founding director Robert Vonderheide, MD, DPhil, who took over as director of Abramson Cancer Center.

Stanger served as instructor at Harvard Medical School from 2003 to 2006 before transitioning to Penn. His research focuses on efforts to understand the molecular and cellular mechanisms of cancer metastasis, specifically malignancies of the pancreas and liver.

The Penn Pancreatic Cancer Research Center team includes medical oncologists, surgeons, gastroenterologists, radiation oncologists, pathologists and radiologists. The team’s research efforts focus on understanding the molecular mechanisms of metastasis; barriers to effective use of immunotherapy for pancreatic cancer; and efforts to identify biomarkers for early-stage disease.