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VIDEO: Pancreatic cancer incidence varies by race, ethnicity

NEW ORLEANS — An analysis of five populations in a multiethnic cohort showed native Hawaiians demonstrated the greatest risk for pancreatic cancer, followed by black individuals, Japanese Americans, white individuals and Latinos.

The interethnic variations in risk did not appear to be explained by differences in the distribution of known risk factors, according to Veronica Wendy Setiawan, PhD, professor at University of South California and Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, who presented the findings at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting.

The elevated risks observed among native Hawaiians and Japanese Americans compared with white individuals are a new discovery.

“In terms of future direction, we would like to ... identify additional factors that might be able to explain the significant factors associated with this excess risk,” Setiawan told HemOnc Today.

NEW ORLEANS — An analysis of five populations in a multiethnic cohort showed native Hawaiians demonstrated the greatest risk for pancreatic cancer, followed by black individuals, Japanese Americans, white individuals and Latinos.

The interethnic variations in risk did not appear to be explained by differences in the distribution of known risk factors, according to Veronica Wendy Setiawan, PhD, professor at University of South California and Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, who presented the findings at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting.

The elevated risks observed among native Hawaiians and Japanese Americans compared with white individuals are a new discovery.

“In terms of future direction, we would like to ... identify additional factors that might be able to explain the significant factors associated with this excess risk,” Setiawan told HemOnc Today.

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