Industry News

Clinician honored for breast cancer research

James Ingle, MD, professor of oncology and Foust professor in the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine in Rochester, Minn., received the 2014 William L. McGuire Memorial Lecture Award at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium in December.

Ingle is co-director of the Mayo Clinic Breast Cancer Specialized Program of Research Excellence (SPORE). SPORE grants are funded by the NCI.

James Ingle, MD

James Ingle

Ingle has led or co-led several studies in breast cancer, including those that have focused on use of tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors. He also has held a leadership role in the Mayo Clinic Pharmacogenomic Research Network, leading multiple genome-wide association studies to investigate genetic variability in patients’ response to tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors as well as chemotherapy.

Ingle and colleagues now are striving to identify genetic biomarkers that can predict who is most likely to benefit from selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) therapies, such as tamoxifen and raloxifene, for breast cancer prevention.

Ingle gave the William L. McGuire Memorial Lecture at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. The lecture was titled “Pharmacogenomics in the Quest for Precision Endocrine Therapy of Breast Cancer.”

James Ingle, MD, professor of oncology and Foust professor in the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine in Rochester, Minn., received the 2014 William L. McGuire Memorial Lecture Award at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium in December.

Ingle is co-director of the Mayo Clinic Breast Cancer Specialized Program of Research Excellence (SPORE). SPORE grants are funded by the NCI.

James Ingle, MD

James Ingle

Ingle has led or co-led several studies in breast cancer, including those that have focused on use of tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors. He also has held a leadership role in the Mayo Clinic Pharmacogenomic Research Network, leading multiple genome-wide association studies to investigate genetic variability in patients’ response to tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors as well as chemotherapy.

Ingle and colleagues now are striving to identify genetic biomarkers that can predict who is most likely to benefit from selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) therapies, such as tamoxifen and raloxifene, for breast cancer prevention.

Ingle gave the William L. McGuire Memorial Lecture at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. The lecture was titled “Pharmacogenomics in the Quest for Precision Endocrine Therapy of Breast Cancer.”