Hematopoietic stem cell researcher to receive lecture award

Margaret A. “Peggy” Goodell, PhD
Margaret A. Goodell

The International Society for Stem Cell Research will honor Margaret A. “Peggy” Goodell, PhD, with the Tobias Lecture Award.

Goodell — chair of the department of molecular and cellular biology and director of the Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Center at Baylor College of Medicine — will receive the award June 26 during a plenary session at the society’s annual meeting in Boston.

The prize, established in 2015 and supported by the Tobias Foundation, recognizes original and promising basic hematology research, as well as direct translational or clinical research related to cell therapy in hematologic disorders.

Goodell is recognized for her expertise in hematopoietic stem cell research and her contributions to understanding of hematopoietic stem cell quiescence. She was the first person to identify the importance of DNMT3 as a key epigenetic regulator of normal hematopoietic stem cell function.

“Peggy has been a pioneer the field of hematopoietic stem cell research for 2 decades, consistently applying fresh ideas and a rigorous approach to her work,” Deepak Srivastava, MD, president of International Society for Stem Cell Research, said in a press release. “She is nationally and internationally recognized for her groundbreaking work and widely regarded for her mentorship of trainees and early career scientists. The [society] is delighted to recognize Dr. Goodell for her tremendous contributions to stem cell research.”

Margaret A. “Peggy” Goodell, PhD
Margaret A. Goodell

The International Society for Stem Cell Research will honor Margaret A. “Peggy” Goodell, PhD, with the Tobias Lecture Award.

Goodell — chair of the department of molecular and cellular biology and director of the Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Center at Baylor College of Medicine — will receive the award June 26 during a plenary session at the society’s annual meeting in Boston.

The prize, established in 2015 and supported by the Tobias Foundation, recognizes original and promising basic hematology research, as well as direct translational or clinical research related to cell therapy in hematologic disorders.

Goodell is recognized for her expertise in hematopoietic stem cell research and her contributions to understanding of hematopoietic stem cell quiescence. She was the first person to identify the importance of DNMT3 as a key epigenetic regulator of normal hematopoietic stem cell function.

“Peggy has been a pioneer the field of hematopoietic stem cell research for 2 decades, consistently applying fresh ideas and a rigorous approach to her work,” Deepak Srivastava, MD, president of International Society for Stem Cell Research, said in a press release. “She is nationally and internationally recognized for her groundbreaking work and widely regarded for her mentorship of trainees and early career scientists. The [society] is delighted to recognize Dr. Goodell for her tremendous contributions to stem cell research.”