Meeting NewsVideo

VIDEO: Physicians must directly discuss complementary medications

ORLANDO — In this exclusive video from Advances in IBD 2017, Adam S. Cheifetz, MD, FACG, from the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, discusses complementary and alternative medication use in inflammatory bowel disease.

“It’s important to be open and frank about the discussion,” Cheifetz told Healio Gastroenterology and Liver Diseease. “Go over the potential benefits, and of course in some of them, the potential risks of the various complementary or alternative therapies. ... None of these are regulated and no one knows exactly what’s in each of the therapies.”

Cheifetz said there is very little evidence on the benefits of complementary or alternative therapies, as most studies are small and do not typically include follow-up or a placebo control cohort.

His overall take home point was that many patients may not address the over the counter or ‘under the counter’ therapies they are taking during discussions with their physician. However, he has found patients are often forthcoming when asked directly.

“Part of every patient interview, when I ask them about what medications they are taking, not only do I ask them how much they’re taking,” Cheifetz said, adding that this gives the patients permission to tell him, “I always ask about other medications: ‘Are you taking anything over the counter?’ Then I’ll usually say, ‘Are you taking anything under the counter?’ and it is amazing what the patients will actually tell you.”

Disclosures: Cheifetz reports he is a consultant to AbbVie, AMAG, Janssen, Miraca Labs, Pfizer, Samsung and Takeda.

ORLANDO — In this exclusive video from Advances in IBD 2017, Adam S. Cheifetz, MD, FACG, from the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, discusses complementary and alternative medication use in inflammatory bowel disease.

“It’s important to be open and frank about the discussion,” Cheifetz told Healio Gastroenterology and Liver Diseease. “Go over the potential benefits, and of course in some of them, the potential risks of the various complementary or alternative therapies. ... None of these are regulated and no one knows exactly what’s in each of the therapies.”

Cheifetz said there is very little evidence on the benefits of complementary or alternative therapies, as most studies are small and do not typically include follow-up or a placebo control cohort.

His overall take home point was that many patients may not address the over the counter or ‘under the counter’ therapies they are taking during discussions with their physician. However, he has found patients are often forthcoming when asked directly.

“Part of every patient interview, when I ask them about what medications they are taking, not only do I ask them how much they’re taking,” Cheifetz said, adding that this gives the patients permission to tell him, “I always ask about other medications: ‘Are you taking anything over the counter?’ Then I’ll usually say, ‘Are you taking anything under the counter?’ and it is amazing what the patients will actually tell you.”

Disclosures: Cheifetz reports he is a consultant to AbbVie, AMAG, Janssen, Miraca Labs, Pfizer, Samsung and Takeda.

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