Meeting NewsVideo

VIDEO: Gut microbiome research sped by technology, informatics, but diet a major confounder

ORLANDO — In this exclusive video from the World Congress of Gastroenterology at ACG 2017, Eamonn M.M. Quigley, MD, MACG, professor of medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College, and chief of gastroenterology and hepatology at Houston Methodist Hospital, shares an overview of the current state of gut microbiome research from the clinician’s perspective, which he discussed during the World Gastroenterology Organization Brohee Lecture.

In his lecture, he emphasized how microbiome research has been amplified by the recent revolution in technology and informatics; discussed potential therapeutic applications, including fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT); and warned about confounding variables in microbiome studies, especially diet.

“A very exciting field, a very good history here, a lot of exciting things over the years, tremendous technological revolution, extremely interesting basic science, but I did express a word of caution about overinterpreting some of these studies, particularly when we make associations,” he told Healio Gastroenterology and Liver Disease. “I did finish on a positive note by saying that the therapeutic side still looks very promising, especially with the advent of very good high-quality studies.”

Reference:

Quigley EMM, et al. WGO Brohee Lecture - News From a Dark Continent – An Assessment of the Diagnostic and Therapeutic Implications of the Gut Microbiome. Presented at: World Congress of Gastroenterology at American College of Gastroenterology Annual Scientific Meeting; Oct. 13-18, 2017; Orlando, FL.

Disclosures: Quigley reports financial relationships with Salix, Alimentary Health, Biocodex, Pharmasierra and Sanofi.

ORLANDO — In this exclusive video from the World Congress of Gastroenterology at ACG 2017, Eamonn M.M. Quigley, MD, MACG, professor of medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College, and chief of gastroenterology and hepatology at Houston Methodist Hospital, shares an overview of the current state of gut microbiome research from the clinician’s perspective, which he discussed during the World Gastroenterology Organization Brohee Lecture.

In his lecture, he emphasized how microbiome research has been amplified by the recent revolution in technology and informatics; discussed potential therapeutic applications, including fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT); and warned about confounding variables in microbiome studies, especially diet.

“A very exciting field, a very good history here, a lot of exciting things over the years, tremendous technological revolution, extremely interesting basic science, but I did express a word of caution about overinterpreting some of these studies, particularly when we make associations,” he told Healio Gastroenterology and Liver Disease. “I did finish on a positive note by saying that the therapeutic side still looks very promising, especially with the advent of very good high-quality studies.”

Reference:

Quigley EMM, et al. WGO Brohee Lecture - News From a Dark Continent – An Assessment of the Diagnostic and Therapeutic Implications of the Gut Microbiome. Presented at: World Congress of Gastroenterology at American College of Gastroenterology Annual Scientific Meeting; Oct. 13-18, 2017; Orlando, FL.

Disclosures: Quigley reports financial relationships with Salix, Alimentary Health, Biocodex, Pharmasierra and Sanofi.

    See more from American College of Gastroenterology Annual Meeting