Meeting News Coverage

Risk factors for in-hospital mortality due to gastric variceal bleeding include ascites, SIRS, PVT

SAN FRANCISCO — Researchers from Temple University Hospital in Philadelphia identified risk factors for inpatient mortality from gastric variceal bleeding, according to a poster presentation at The Liver Meeting 2015.

Using 2008 to 2011 data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, the researchers identified a weighted total of 8,711 individuals with gastric variceal bleeding (mean age, 54 ± 12.4 years; 66.3% male; mean length of stay, 6 ± 6.8 days), 16 of whom were missing mortality data. Then they performed multivariate analysis adjusting for case severity to determine risk factors for gastric variceal bleeding mortality.

Overall inpatient mortality was 8.3%, which was lower than expected. The researchers found that ascites (OR = 2.2; 95% CI, 1.6-2.9), systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS; OR = 3.4; 95% CI, 2.3-5) and portal vein thrombosis (OR = 1.9; 95% CI, 1.2-3.1) all increased mortality risk.

“The comorbidity of ascites and SIRS leading to increased risk for mortality may be related to the risk of infection, as this is a major cause of in-patient hospital mortality in these patients,” the researchers wrote. “To our knowledge, this is the first study evaluating in-patient hospital mortality of gastric variceal bleeding in the United States.” – by Adam Leitenberger

Reference: 

Chang P, et al. Abstract 765. Presented at: The Liver Meeting; Nov. 13-17, 2015; San Francisco.

Disclosures: Chang reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the abstract for a full list of all other researchers’ relevant financial disclosures.

SAN FRANCISCO — Researchers from Temple University Hospital in Philadelphia identified risk factors for inpatient mortality from gastric variceal bleeding, according to a poster presentation at The Liver Meeting 2015.

Using 2008 to 2011 data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, the researchers identified a weighted total of 8,711 individuals with gastric variceal bleeding (mean age, 54 ± 12.4 years; 66.3% male; mean length of stay, 6 ± 6.8 days), 16 of whom were missing mortality data. Then they performed multivariate analysis adjusting for case severity to determine risk factors for gastric variceal bleeding mortality.

Overall inpatient mortality was 8.3%, which was lower than expected. The researchers found that ascites (OR = 2.2; 95% CI, 1.6-2.9), systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS; OR = 3.4; 95% CI, 2.3-5) and portal vein thrombosis (OR = 1.9; 95% CI, 1.2-3.1) all increased mortality risk.

“The comorbidity of ascites and SIRS leading to increased risk for mortality may be related to the risk of infection, as this is a major cause of in-patient hospital mortality in these patients,” the researchers wrote. “To our knowledge, this is the first study evaluating in-patient hospital mortality of gastric variceal bleeding in the United States.” – by Adam Leitenberger

Reference: 

Chang P, et al. Abstract 765. Presented at: The Liver Meeting; Nov. 13-17, 2015; San Francisco.

Disclosures: Chang reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the abstract for a full list of all other researchers’ relevant financial disclosures.

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