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U.S. News & World Report ranks Mayo Clinic best in gastroenterology, GI surgery

Mayo Clinic has been ranked the No. 1 gastroenterology and GI surgery hospital in the nation, according to the 2014-2015 edition of Best Hospitals survey conducted by U.S. News & World Report.

In addition to its top ranking for gastroenterology and GI surgery, Mayo Clinic was ranked No. 1 in seven other specialties, including Diabetes and Endocrinology; Ear, Nose and Throat; Geriatrics; Gynecology; Nephrology; Neurology; and Neurosurgery and Pulmonology. It also ranked No. 2 in Cardiology and Heart Surgery; Orthopedics and Urology; No. 3 in Cancer; No. 4 in Rehabilitation and Rheumatology; No. 7 in Psychiatry; and was recognized as “high performing” in Ophthalmology.

“We are honored and proud that our patient-focused academic practice is being recognized again this year as the highest rated in gastroenterology and hepatology,” Vijay Shah, MD, chairman, Mayo Clinic, department of gastroenterology and hepatology, told Healio.com/Gastroenterology. “It is a reflection of a dedicated staff that work within a remarkable system to provide a seamless and high value patient experience.”

“These endorsements reinforce our 150-year commitment to provide the highest quality care to each patient every day,” John Noseworthy, MD, Mayo Clinic president and CEO, said in a press release. “While no single set of measures can perfectly represent health care quality, we are proud to be recognized by so many. We are honored by this recognition, and we remain focused on our primary mission: putting the needs of our patients first and creating for them the best possible, most trusted and affordable model of health care for the future.”

In gastroenterology and GI surgery, from a list of more than 1,500 hospitals, the top 10 hospitals in the report included:

  1. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn.
  2. Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland
  3. Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston
  4. Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore
  5. UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles
  6. Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles
  7. UPMC-University of Pittsburgh Medical Center
  8. New York-Presbyterian University Hospital of Columbia and Cornell, New York
  9. Mount Sinai Hospital, New York
  10. Hospitals of the University of Pennsylvania-Penn Presbyterian, Philadelphia 

U.S. News & World Report published its first report on hospitals in 1990. Since then, the report has grown to include 16 specialties: cancer; neurology and neurosurgery; cardiology and heart surgery; ophthalmology; diabetes and endocrinology; orthopedics; ear, nose and throat; pulmonology; gastroenterology and GI surgery; psychiatry; geriatrics; rehabilitation; gynecology; rheumatology; nephrology; and urology. The list has changed during the years. HIV/AIDS was removed from the list in 1998 once its treatment had moved primarily to outpatient settings. In 2007, pediatrics was separated from the list, and a separate report on pediatric hospitals was developed.

The data for the report are mostly derived from information provided by the American Hospital Association using a metric U.S. News & World Report called an “index of hospital quality,” based on structure, process, outcomes and patient safety. Structural measures include the amount and types of technology provided, the availability of nursing staff, and other patient services. The process of care measures the ways care is delivered, from diagnosis to treatment, prevention and patient education. Outcomes are based on risk-adjusted overall survival. Because mortality is a key factor in the complex weighting system employed by U.S. News & World Report, ophthalmology, psychiatry, rehabilitation and rheumatology are judged using a reputation metric.

To be eligible for inclusion, a hospital must be a member in the council of teaching hospitals, be affiliated with a medical school, or have at least 200 beds and associated staff or at least 100 beds and at least four “key technologies” such as advanced imaging devices, a cardiac ICU and robotic surgery. Other criteria include statistics related to volume and discharge.

A dashboard is available for hospitals to communicate directly with U.S. News & World Report and provide information, download report methodology and read related articles.

Note: Data reprinted with permission from U.S. News & World Report.

Mayo Clinic has been ranked the No. 1 gastroenterology and GI surgery hospital in the nation, according to the 2014-2015 edition of Best Hospitals survey conducted by U.S. News & World Report.

In addition to its top ranking for gastroenterology and GI surgery, Mayo Clinic was ranked No. 1 in seven other specialties, including Diabetes and Endocrinology; Ear, Nose and Throat; Geriatrics; Gynecology; Nephrology; Neurology; and Neurosurgery and Pulmonology. It also ranked No. 2 in Cardiology and Heart Surgery; Orthopedics and Urology; No. 3 in Cancer; No. 4 in Rehabilitation and Rheumatology; No. 7 in Psychiatry; and was recognized as “high performing” in Ophthalmology.

“We are honored and proud that our patient-focused academic practice is being recognized again this year as the highest rated in gastroenterology and hepatology,” Vijay Shah, MD, chairman, Mayo Clinic, department of gastroenterology and hepatology, told Healio.com/Gastroenterology. “It is a reflection of a dedicated staff that work within a remarkable system to provide a seamless and high value patient experience.”

“These endorsements reinforce our 150-year commitment to provide the highest quality care to each patient every day,” John Noseworthy, MD, Mayo Clinic president and CEO, said in a press release. “While no single set of measures can perfectly represent health care quality, we are proud to be recognized by so many. We are honored by this recognition, and we remain focused on our primary mission: putting the needs of our patients first and creating for them the best possible, most trusted and affordable model of health care for the future.”

In gastroenterology and GI surgery, from a list of more than 1,500 hospitals, the top 10 hospitals in the report included:

  1. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn.
  2. Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland
  3. Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston
  4. Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore
  5. UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles
  6. Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles
  7. UPMC-University of Pittsburgh Medical Center
  8. New York-Presbyterian University Hospital of Columbia and Cornell, New York
  9. Mount Sinai Hospital, New York
  10. Hospitals of the University of Pennsylvania-Penn Presbyterian, Philadelphia 

U.S. News & World Report published its first report on hospitals in 1990. Since then, the report has grown to include 16 specialties: cancer; neurology and neurosurgery; cardiology and heart surgery; ophthalmology; diabetes and endocrinology; orthopedics; ear, nose and throat; pulmonology; gastroenterology and GI surgery; psychiatry; geriatrics; rehabilitation; gynecology; rheumatology; nephrology; and urology. The list has changed during the years. HIV/AIDS was removed from the list in 1998 once its treatment had moved primarily to outpatient settings. In 2007, pediatrics was separated from the list, and a separate report on pediatric hospitals was developed.

The data for the report are mostly derived from information provided by the American Hospital Association using a metric U.S. News & World Report called an “index of hospital quality,” based on structure, process, outcomes and patient safety. Structural measures include the amount and types of technology provided, the availability of nursing staff, and other patient services. The process of care measures the ways care is delivered, from diagnosis to treatment, prevention and patient education. Outcomes are based on risk-adjusted overall survival. Because mortality is a key factor in the complex weighting system employed by U.S. News & World Report, ophthalmology, psychiatry, rehabilitation and rheumatology are judged using a reputation metric.

To be eligible for inclusion, a hospital must be a member in the council of teaching hospitals, be affiliated with a medical school, or have at least 200 beds and associated staff or at least 100 beds and at least four “key technologies” such as advanced imaging devices, a cardiac ICU and robotic surgery. Other criteria include statistics related to volume and discharge.

A dashboard is available for hospitals to communicate directly with U.S. News & World Report and provide information, download report methodology and read related articles.

Note: Data reprinted with permission from U.S. News & World Report.