Meeting NewsVideo

VIDEO: Social networking crucial to ‘cultivate the next generation’

LAS VEGAS — In this exclusive video from Crohn’s & Colitis Congress 2019, Maria T. Abreu, MD, AGAF, division chief of gastroenterology at University of Miami Health System, discusses several of the social events held at the meeting and highlights the importance of hosting such events.

“It’s really our mission to cultivate the next generation of people that are going to do IBD-related research and to that end we focused a lot of energy about making sure that we have had programming for young people,” Abreu, who is also an organizing committee co-chair of the Crohn’s & Colitis Congress, told Healio Gastroenterology and Liver Disease.

Abreu highlighted some of the programming geared toward cultivating and growing younger physicians. Those programs included a mock review panel that went through things the attendees would need to have in their grants to be successful.

Additionally, Abreu discussed the Women in IBD Breakfast held on Friday.

“It’s always a wonderful opportunity to have young women and women that are more experienced discussing some of the barriers that they faced, or not faced, and trying to figure out how to help each other and how to make sure we are successful as leaders at all levels,” she said.

Disclosure: Abreu reports no relevant financial disclosures.

LAS VEGAS — In this exclusive video from Crohn’s & Colitis Congress 2019, Maria T. Abreu, MD, AGAF, division chief of gastroenterology at University of Miami Health System, discusses several of the social events held at the meeting and highlights the importance of hosting such events.

“It’s really our mission to cultivate the next generation of people that are going to do IBD-related research and to that end we focused a lot of energy about making sure that we have had programming for young people,” Abreu, who is also an organizing committee co-chair of the Crohn’s & Colitis Congress, told Healio Gastroenterology and Liver Disease.

Abreu highlighted some of the programming geared toward cultivating and growing younger physicians. Those programs included a mock review panel that went through things the attendees would need to have in their grants to be successful.

Additionally, Abreu discussed the Women in IBD Breakfast held on Friday.

“It’s always a wonderful opportunity to have young women and women that are more experienced discussing some of the barriers that they faced, or not faced, and trying to figure out how to help each other and how to make sure we are successful as leaders at all levels,” she said.

Disclosure: Abreu reports no relevant financial disclosures.

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