8 gastrointestinal, liver cancer stories you may have missed

Recently published studies have demonstrated new developments in the testing, diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal and liver cancers.

In case you missed it, the editors of Healio Gastroenterology and Liver Disease have compiled a recap of some of our most recent popular articles involving these cancers.

Q&A: Fecal transplant appears effective for immunotherapy-induced colitis

Fecal microbiota transplantation may be a viable treatment option for patients with cancer who have developed immunotherapy-induced colitis, according to results of a case series published in Nature Medicine.

Immunotherapy-induced colitis, the second most common side effect from immune checkpoint inhibitors, occurs in up to 40% of patients with cancer, according to Yinghong Wang, MD, PhD, director of Medication Induced Colitis and Enteritis at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

Wang spoke with Healio Gastroenterology and Liver Disease about how the idea of using FMT as a treatment option came about, the effectiveness of FMT and how gastroenterologists play a role in treating these patients. READ MORE.

First patient enrolled in pancreatic cancer study

The Henry Ford Cancer Institute has announced that it has enrolled the first patient in a new trial to test the effectiveness of precise, higher dose MRI-guided radiation therapy to treat pancreatic cancer. READ MORE.

Endoscopic full-thickness resection feasible, safe for early colorectal cancer

Using endoscopic full-thickness resection can help stratify patients with early colorectal cancer and allows patients with low-risk lesions to avoid surgery, according to research published in Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

Arthur Schmidt, MD, of the department of medicine at the University of Freiburg in Germany, and colleagues wrote that differences in treatment recommendations for high-risk and low-risk lesions make classifying patients for the best treatment strategy critically important. READ MORE.

Colon, rectal cancer mortality rates projected to decrease in most countries by 2035

Colon and rectal cancer mortality rates are projected to decrease by the year 2035 in most countries across the globe except some countries in Latin American and the Caribbean, according to results from a trend-based prediction study on data from a WHO mortality database.

The study results, however, also indicated that rectal cancer mortality is predicted to rise substantially in some countries including the United States and Australia. READ MORE.

23andMe receives FDA clearance for hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome genetic test

FDA granted clearance to 23andMe’s genetic health risk report for MUTYH-associated polyposis, a hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome.

The MUTYH-Associated Polyposis report — although not yet available — is a direct-to-consumer genetic test that is cleared by the FDA for use without prescription. This clearance followed the FDA’s authorization for 23andMe’s BRCA1/BRCA2 (Selected Variants) Genetic Health Risk report last March. READ MORE.

Liver cancer recurrence rates similar regardless of DAA experience

Patients with complete response to hepatocellular carcinoma and underwent direct-acting antiviral therapy for hepatitis C had similar rates of cancer recurrence compared with patients who did not receive DAA therapy, according to a study published in Gastroenterology. READ MORE.

Regular vigorous exercise reduces liver cancer risk

Regular vigorous physical activity reduced the risk for hepatocellular carcinoma by approximately 45%, according to recently published data.

“The distribution of HCC varies greatly according to geographic location and it is more common in low- and middle-income countries than in developed countries,” Sebastian E. Baumeister, PhD, from the University of Greifswald in Germany, and colleagues wrote. “The recent increase in HCC incidence is thought to be caused by increases in obesity, diabetes, and physical inactivity.” READ MORE.

FDA approves Cabometyx for treatment-experienced patients with HCC

Exelixis has announced it has received FDA approval for Cabometyx to treat patients with hepatocellular carcinoma who previously underwent treatment with Nexavar, according to a press release. READ MORE.

Recently published studies have demonstrated new developments in the testing, diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal and liver cancers.

In case you missed it, the editors of Healio Gastroenterology and Liver Disease have compiled a recap of some of our most recent popular articles involving these cancers.

Q&A: Fecal transplant appears effective for immunotherapy-induced colitis

Fecal microbiota transplantation may be a viable treatment option for patients with cancer who have developed immunotherapy-induced colitis, according to results of a case series published in Nature Medicine.

Immunotherapy-induced colitis, the second most common side effect from immune checkpoint inhibitors, occurs in up to 40% of patients with cancer, according to Yinghong Wang, MD, PhD, director of Medication Induced Colitis and Enteritis at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

Wang spoke with Healio Gastroenterology and Liver Disease about how the idea of using FMT as a treatment option came about, the effectiveness of FMT and how gastroenterologists play a role in treating these patients. READ MORE.

First patient enrolled in pancreatic cancer study

The Henry Ford Cancer Institute has announced that it has enrolled the first patient in a new trial to test the effectiveness of precise, higher dose MRI-guided radiation therapy to treat pancreatic cancer. READ MORE.

Endoscopic full-thickness resection feasible, safe for early colorectal cancer

Using endoscopic full-thickness resection can help stratify patients with early colorectal cancer and allows patients with low-risk lesions to avoid surgery, according to research published in Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

Arthur Schmidt, MD, of the department of medicine at the University of Freiburg in Germany, and colleagues wrote that differences in treatment recommendations for high-risk and low-risk lesions make classifying patients for the best treatment strategy critically important. READ MORE.

Colon, rectal cancer mortality rates projected to decrease in most countries by 2035

Colon and rectal cancer mortality rates are projected to decrease by the year 2035 in most countries across the globe except some countries in Latin American and the Caribbean, according to results from a trend-based prediction study on data from a WHO mortality database.

The study results, however, also indicated that rectal cancer mortality is predicted to rise substantially in some countries including the United States and Australia. READ MORE.

23andMe receives FDA clearance for hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome genetic test

FDA granted clearance to 23andMe’s genetic health risk report for MUTYH-associated polyposis, a hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome.

The MUTYH-Associated Polyposis report — although not yet available — is a direct-to-consumer genetic test that is cleared by the FDA for use without prescription. This clearance followed the FDA’s authorization for 23andMe’s BRCA1/BRCA2 (Selected Variants) Genetic Health Risk report last March. READ MORE.

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Liver cancer recurrence rates similar regardless of DAA experience

Patients with complete response to hepatocellular carcinoma and underwent direct-acting antiviral therapy for hepatitis C had similar rates of cancer recurrence compared with patients who did not receive DAA therapy, according to a study published in Gastroenterology. READ MORE.

Regular vigorous exercise reduces liver cancer risk

Regular vigorous physical activity reduced the risk for hepatocellular carcinoma by approximately 45%, according to recently published data.

“The distribution of HCC varies greatly according to geographic location and it is more common in low- and middle-income countries than in developed countries,” Sebastian E. Baumeister, PhD, from the University of Greifswald in Germany, and colleagues wrote. “The recent increase in HCC incidence is thought to be caused by increases in obesity, diabetes, and physical inactivity.” READ MORE.

FDA approves Cabometyx for treatment-experienced patients with HCC

Exelixis has announced it has received FDA approval for Cabometyx to treat patients with hepatocellular carcinoma who previously underwent treatment with Nexavar, according to a press release. READ MORE.

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