Meeting NewsVideo

Video: Food-restrictive eating disorders should be front of mind

PHILADELPHIA – In this exclusive video from the American College of Gastroenterology Annual Meeting, William Chey, MD, FACG, from the University of Michigan, describes two newer eating disorders physicians need to think about when recommending diets to patients with gastrointestinal problems.

“More and more we’re talking about the use of the low-FODMAP diet, gluten-free diet, lactose-reduced diet, many different diets that restrict intake of various foods,” Chey told Healio Gastroenterology and Liver Disease. “Realize that there are two eating disorders that have recently been described that gastroenterologists might not be familiar with.”

The first, Chey said, is avoidant restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID), which is when a patient over-restricts their diet based on unfounded fears of an adverse physical reaction to food or because of the appearance or texture of food. He said ARFID was recently recognized by the DSM-5.

The other disorder is Orthorexia Nervosa, defined as an obsession with eating foods that one considers healthy, leading to an over-restricted diet.

While more research is needed, Chey said recommending restrictive diets for GI conditions could have an adverse effect in patients prone to these disorders.

“It’s important to think about these conditions,” he said. “It may even be important to screen for these conditions if you’re recommending restrictive diets to your patients with GI conditions.”

Disclosure: Chey reports financial ties to Nestle, True Self Foods and MyGiHealth.

 

 

PHILADELPHIA – In this exclusive video from the American College of Gastroenterology Annual Meeting, William Chey, MD, FACG, from the University of Michigan, describes two newer eating disorders physicians need to think about when recommending diets to patients with gastrointestinal problems.

“More and more we’re talking about the use of the low-FODMAP diet, gluten-free diet, lactose-reduced diet, many different diets that restrict intake of various foods,” Chey told Healio Gastroenterology and Liver Disease. “Realize that there are two eating disorders that have recently been described that gastroenterologists might not be familiar with.”

The first, Chey said, is avoidant restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID), which is when a patient over-restricts their diet based on unfounded fears of an adverse physical reaction to food or because of the appearance or texture of food. He said ARFID was recently recognized by the DSM-5.

The other disorder is Orthorexia Nervosa, defined as an obsession with eating foods that one considers healthy, leading to an over-restricted diet.

While more research is needed, Chey said recommending restrictive diets for GI conditions could have an adverse effect in patients prone to these disorders.

“It’s important to think about these conditions,” he said. “It may even be important to screen for these conditions if you’re recommending restrictive diets to your patients with GI conditions.”

Disclosure: Chey reports financial ties to Nestle, True Self Foods and MyGiHealth.

 

 

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