5 stories you may have missed in April

Healio Gastroenterology and Liver Disease compiled a list of some of the top stories we posted in April.

Our readers were most interested in two FDA approvals, as well as results of a study involving IBD and the prevalence other immune mediated inflammatory diseases.

FDA approves reintroduction of Zelnorm for IBS-C in certain women

The FDA approved the reintroduction of Zelnorm, a twice-daily oral treatment for irritable bowel syndrome with constipation in women aged under 65 years, according to a company press release.

The FDA originally approved tegaserod (Zelnorm, Sloan Pharmaceuticals) in 2002 for the treatment of IBS-C in women. However, Novartis, the drug’s previous manufacturer, voluntarily pulled tegaserod from the U.S. market in 2007 due to possible cardiac-related side effects. READ MORE.

Nearly one-quarter of patients with IBD have a concurrent IMID

A Danish cohort study revealed that nearly one in four patients with inflammatory bowel disease have another immune mediated inflammatory disease that can impact disease course and increase severity.

Johan Burisch , MD, PhD, of the Center for Clinical Research and Prevention at Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital in Denmark, and colleagues wrote that previous studies have explored the overall prevalence of IMIDs, as well as the increased risk for IMIDs among patients with IBD. However, less attention has been paid to the timing of the onset of IMIDs and their impact on disease course. READ MORE.

FDA approves non-surgical weight loss device for obesity

The FDA has approved a non-surgical weight loss device for adults with obesity and have a body mass index of 30 kg/m2 to 40 kg/m2, according to a press release.

“Those of us who participated in the pivotal trial have the firsthand experience with the TPS device and were pleased with its patient outcomes,” Richard Rothstein, MD, chair of the department of medicine at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, said in the release. “In addition to the clinically meaningful weight loss seen in the study group who received the device, we also observed cardio-metabolic improvements in that cohort. We are excited to see that the device is approved by the FDA and look forward to using it in our clinical practice.” READ MORE.

Entyvio ‘should be’ first choice for patients with UC who previously failed Remicade

In a direct comparison with Humira, Entyvio won out as the top choice for second line therapy for patients with ulcerative colitis who failed therapy with Remicade, according to research published in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

Massimo Claudio Fantini , MD, PhD, from the University of Rome, and colleagues wrote that there are no solid data to support which drug should be used as a follow-up in patients who do not respond or lose response to Remicade (infliximab, Janssen). READ MORE.

Protective bacteria found in patients with IBS

Although diversity of the gut microbiota in patients with irritable bowel syndrome was similar to controls, a systematic review published in Gastroenterology identified specific bacteria that were either present or protective in IBS.

Paul Moayyedi , PhD, MPH, AGAF, of the division of gastroenterology at McMaster University in Canada, and colleagues wrote that research over the last 10 years has positioned an altered gut microbiota as a possible cause of IBS. READ MORE.

Healio Gastroenterology and Liver Disease compiled a list of some of the top stories we posted in April.

Our readers were most interested in two FDA approvals, as well as results of a study involving IBD and the prevalence other immune mediated inflammatory diseases.

FDA approves reintroduction of Zelnorm for IBS-C in certain women

The FDA approved the reintroduction of Zelnorm, a twice-daily oral treatment for irritable bowel syndrome with constipation in women aged under 65 years, according to a company press release.

The FDA originally approved tegaserod (Zelnorm, Sloan Pharmaceuticals) in 2002 for the treatment of IBS-C in women. However, Novartis, the drug’s previous manufacturer, voluntarily pulled tegaserod from the U.S. market in 2007 due to possible cardiac-related side effects. READ MORE.

Nearly one-quarter of patients with IBD have a concurrent IMID

A Danish cohort study revealed that nearly one in four patients with inflammatory bowel disease have another immune mediated inflammatory disease that can impact disease course and increase severity.

Johan Burisch , MD, PhD, of the Center for Clinical Research and Prevention at Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital in Denmark, and colleagues wrote that previous studies have explored the overall prevalence of IMIDs, as well as the increased risk for IMIDs among patients with IBD. However, less attention has been paid to the timing of the onset of IMIDs and their impact on disease course. READ MORE.

FDA approves non-surgical weight loss device for obesity

The FDA has approved a non-surgical weight loss device for adults with obesity and have a body mass index of 30 kg/m2 to 40 kg/m2, according to a press release.

“Those of us who participated in the pivotal trial have the firsthand experience with the TPS device and were pleased with its patient outcomes,” Richard Rothstein, MD, chair of the department of medicine at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, said in the release. “In addition to the clinically meaningful weight loss seen in the study group who received the device, we also observed cardio-metabolic improvements in that cohort. We are excited to see that the device is approved by the FDA and look forward to using it in our clinical practice.” READ MORE.

Entyvio ‘should be’ first choice for patients with UC who previously failed Remicade

In a direct comparison with Humira, Entyvio won out as the top choice for second line therapy for patients with ulcerative colitis who failed therapy with Remicade, according to research published in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

Massimo Claudio Fantini , MD, PhD, from the University of Rome, and colleagues wrote that there are no solid data to support which drug should be used as a follow-up in patients who do not respond or lose response to Remicade (infliximab, Janssen). READ MORE.

Protective bacteria found in patients with IBS

Although diversity of the gut microbiota in patients with irritable bowel syndrome was similar to controls, a systematic review published in Gastroenterology identified specific bacteria that were either present or protective in IBS.

Paul Moayyedi , PhD, MPH, AGAF, of the division of gastroenterology at McMaster University in Canada, and colleagues wrote that research over the last 10 years has positioned an altered gut microbiota as a possible cause of IBS. READ MORE.

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