Meeting NewsVideo

VIDEO: Expert highlights EUS research at ACG

PHILADELPHIA — In this exclusive video perspective from the American College of Gastroenterology Annual Meeting, John Salzman, MD, FACG, of Brigham and Women's Hospital, highlights two studies presented at the meeting that used endoscopic ultrasonography.

The first study involved endoscopic ablation on pancreatic cysts.

“They studied 21 patients with pancreatic cystic neoplasms. They seemed to be larger, sizeable cystic neoplasms,” he told Healio Gastroenterology and Liver Disease. “What they did was a combination of endoscopic techniques.”

In the study, researchers used a combination of endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS)-guided radiofrequency ablation and lauromacrogol ablation. Saltzman said the researchers demonstrated that they were able to significantly reduce the size of these cysts in most of their patients, and that they could do it safely with a low rate of complications.

“This is a proof of principle study,” he said. “There was no surgical pathology done, so we don’t know, truly, what happened to the cysts, but there were dramatic decreases in cyst size.”

The second study Saltzman focused on investigated EUS-guided liver biopsy compared with percutaneous and transjugular liver biopsy.

In the study, researchers found that the EUS technique required fewer passes than transjugular to retrieve the tissue they needed for the biopsy.

“This is an increasingly used technique in hospitals,” Saltzman said. “It showed that we can get tissue this way. It seemed to be adequate.”

Disclosure : Saltzman reports no relevant financial disclosures.

PHILADELPHIA — In this exclusive video perspective from the American College of Gastroenterology Annual Meeting, John Salzman, MD, FACG, of Brigham and Women's Hospital, highlights two studies presented at the meeting that used endoscopic ultrasonography.

The first study involved endoscopic ablation on pancreatic cysts.

“They studied 21 patients with pancreatic cystic neoplasms. They seemed to be larger, sizeable cystic neoplasms,” he told Healio Gastroenterology and Liver Disease. “What they did was a combination of endoscopic techniques.”

In the study, researchers used a combination of endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS)-guided radiofrequency ablation and lauromacrogol ablation. Saltzman said the researchers demonstrated that they were able to significantly reduce the size of these cysts in most of their patients, and that they could do it safely with a low rate of complications.

“This is a proof of principle study,” he said. “There was no surgical pathology done, so we don’t know, truly, what happened to the cysts, but there were dramatic decreases in cyst size.”

The second study Saltzman focused on investigated EUS-guided liver biopsy compared with percutaneous and transjugular liver biopsy.

In the study, researchers found that the EUS technique required fewer passes than transjugular to retrieve the tissue they needed for the biopsy.

“This is an increasingly used technique in hospitals,” Saltzman said. “It showed that we can get tissue this way. It seemed to be adequate.”

Disclosure : Saltzman reports no relevant financial disclosures.

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