Meeting NewsVideo

VIDEO: Future of liver transplant points to changing indications, allocation

PHILADELPHIA — In this exclusive video perspective from the American College of Gastroenterology Annual Meeting, Paul Y. Kwo, MD, FACG, from Stanford University in California, provides an overview of the changing landscape in liver transplantation and what to expect in the coming years.

“One of the things that’s most interesting about liver transplantation is that the demographics of those who are getting transplanted is changing,” Kwo told Healio Gastroenterology and Liver Disease. “For many decades, the number one indication worldwide for liver transplantation has been hepatitis C-related cirrhosis, but with the marked advances we’ve had in direct-acting antiviral agents now two other diseases are replacing [HCV] and they are alcohol-related liver disease and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.”

In his discussion, Kwo covered new explorations in offering transplantation to individuals with acute alcoholic hepatitis without the normal prerequisite of sobriety. Specifically, patients who appear to have a good social support and have not had problematic relapses have demonstrated good posttransplant outcomes.

Additionally, Kwo explained that the rules for organ allocation will be changing to improve equitability.

“The goal is to be able to allow a reduction in the geographic disparity of organ allocation,” Kwo said. “Likely this rule change will involve concentric circles around donor service areas, but the final rules are not written. They’ll be done by the end of the year.”

Disclosure : Kwo reports he is an advisory committee or board member of Conatus and Durect; and has stock or ownership interest in Durect.

PHILADELPHIA — In this exclusive video perspective from the American College of Gastroenterology Annual Meeting, Paul Y. Kwo, MD, FACG, from Stanford University in California, provides an overview of the changing landscape in liver transplantation and what to expect in the coming years.

“One of the things that’s most interesting about liver transplantation is that the demographics of those who are getting transplanted is changing,” Kwo told Healio Gastroenterology and Liver Disease. “For many decades, the number one indication worldwide for liver transplantation has been hepatitis C-related cirrhosis, but with the marked advances we’ve had in direct-acting antiviral agents now two other diseases are replacing [HCV] and they are alcohol-related liver disease and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.”

In his discussion, Kwo covered new explorations in offering transplantation to individuals with acute alcoholic hepatitis without the normal prerequisite of sobriety. Specifically, patients who appear to have a good social support and have not had problematic relapses have demonstrated good posttransplant outcomes.

Additionally, Kwo explained that the rules for organ allocation will be changing to improve equitability.

“The goal is to be able to allow a reduction in the geographic disparity of organ allocation,” Kwo said. “Likely this rule change will involve concentric circles around donor service areas, but the final rules are not written. They’ll be done by the end of the year.”

Disclosure : Kwo reports he is an advisory committee or board member of Conatus and Durect; and has stock or ownership interest in Durect.

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