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Long-term cannabis use increases risk for IBS

ORLANDO — Cannabis use increased the risk for irritable bowel syndrome in the general population, according to a poster presented at the World Congress of Gastroenterology at ACG 2017. Additionally, the effects may be worse among men, Caucasians and Hispanics.

To determine the association between long-term cannabis use and the endogenous cannabinoid system, researchers analyzed 4,709,043 patients from the 2014 Nationwide Inpatient Survey. They found 0.03% had a primary admission for IBS and 1.32% for cannabis use disorder.

Cannabis use disorder was correlated with an increased risk for IBS (OR = 2.03; 95% CI, 1.53-2.71). The risk increased for men (OR = 3.48; 95% CI, 1.98-6.12) compared with women (OR = 1.48; 95% CI, 0.88-2.5) and among Caucasians (OR = 5.28; 95% CI, 1.77-15.76) and Hispanics (OR = 1.8; 95% CI, 1.02-3.18) compared with African-Americans (OR = 1.8; 95% CI, 0.65-5.03).

Following propensity matched analysis, the researchers found that cannabis use disorder was correlated with an 80% increased risk for IBS (OR = 1.82; 95% CI, 1.27-2.6).

Recently, Healio.com/Hepatology reported that chronic use of cannabinoid derivatives was also correlated with increased cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome, which is categorized by episodes of severe nausea and cyclical vomiting. Symptoms improved with cannabis cessation. – by Talitha Bennett

Reference: Adejumo A, et al. P1150. Presented at: World Congress of Gastroenterology at American College of Gastroenterology Annual Scientific Meeting; Oct. 13-18, 2017; Orlando, FL.

Disclosure: Adejumo reports no relevant financial disclosures.

ORLANDO — Cannabis use increased the risk for irritable bowel syndrome in the general population, according to a poster presented at the World Congress of Gastroenterology at ACG 2017. Additionally, the effects may be worse among men, Caucasians and Hispanics.

To determine the association between long-term cannabis use and the endogenous cannabinoid system, researchers analyzed 4,709,043 patients from the 2014 Nationwide Inpatient Survey. They found 0.03% had a primary admission for IBS and 1.32% for cannabis use disorder.

Cannabis use disorder was correlated with an increased risk for IBS (OR = 2.03; 95% CI, 1.53-2.71). The risk increased for men (OR = 3.48; 95% CI, 1.98-6.12) compared with women (OR = 1.48; 95% CI, 0.88-2.5) and among Caucasians (OR = 5.28; 95% CI, 1.77-15.76) and Hispanics (OR = 1.8; 95% CI, 1.02-3.18) compared with African-Americans (OR = 1.8; 95% CI, 0.65-5.03).

Following propensity matched analysis, the researchers found that cannabis use disorder was correlated with an 80% increased risk for IBS (OR = 1.82; 95% CI, 1.27-2.6).

Recently, Healio.com/Hepatology reported that chronic use of cannabinoid derivatives was also correlated with increased cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome, which is categorized by episodes of severe nausea and cyclical vomiting. Symptoms improved with cannabis cessation. – by Talitha Bennett

Reference: Adejumo A, et al. P1150. Presented at: World Congress of Gastroenterology at American College of Gastroenterology Annual Scientific Meeting; Oct. 13-18, 2017; Orlando, FL.

Disclosure: Adejumo reports no relevant financial disclosures.

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