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Migraine may increase risk for IBS in patients without comorbid mood disorders

Migraine was a risk factor for future development of irritable bowel syndrome in patients who do not have comorbid mood disorders, but not in patients with comorbid mood disorders, according to data presented at the American Academy of Neurology Annual Meeting.

Mood disorders like anxiety and depression are associated with an increased risk for migraine and IBS, and migraine is also associated with an increased risk for IBS, but the role of mood disorders in the relationship between migraine and IBS is not well understood, the researchers wrote.

Therefore, they used Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database records to identify 2,859 individuals with migraine and 5,718 controls matched by age, sex, hypertension, diabetes and mood disorders, and compared the risk for developing IBS between patients with and without mood disorders.

Individuals with pre-existing catastrophic illnesses, and an IBS diagnosis before or within 30 days of the index visit, were excluded. Patients were followed for 7 years or until they were diagnosed with IBS or were lost to follow-up.

Overall, 8.4% of patients with migraine developed IBS compared with 5.4% of controls. An increased risk for developing IBS was found to be associated with migraine (HR = 1.58; 95% CI, 1.33-1.87). When comparing patients with and without mood disorders, they found migraine significantly increased risk for IBS in patients who did not have mood disorders, but did not significantly increase this risk in patients who did have co-existing mood disorders.

The researchers concluded that their results suggest migraine is a risk factor for development of IBS among patients without comorbid mood disorders, whereas patients with comorbid mood disorders experience no significant additional risk for developing IBS associated with migraine. – by Adam Leitenberger

Reference:

Chen Y-Y and Wu M-F. Abstract P1.146. Presented at: American Academy of Neurology Annual Meeting; April 15-21, 2016; Vancouver, British Columbia.

Disclosure: Healio Gastroenterology was unable to confirm the researchers’ relevant financial disclosures at the time of publication.

Migraine was a risk factor for future development of irritable bowel syndrome in patients who do not have comorbid mood disorders, but not in patients with comorbid mood disorders, according to data presented at the American Academy of Neurology Annual Meeting.

Mood disorders like anxiety and depression are associated with an increased risk for migraine and IBS, and migraine is also associated with an increased risk for IBS, but the role of mood disorders in the relationship between migraine and IBS is not well understood, the researchers wrote.

Therefore, they used Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database records to identify 2,859 individuals with migraine and 5,718 controls matched by age, sex, hypertension, diabetes and mood disorders, and compared the risk for developing IBS between patients with and without mood disorders.

Individuals with pre-existing catastrophic illnesses, and an IBS diagnosis before or within 30 days of the index visit, were excluded. Patients were followed for 7 years or until they were diagnosed with IBS or were lost to follow-up.

Overall, 8.4% of patients with migraine developed IBS compared with 5.4% of controls. An increased risk for developing IBS was found to be associated with migraine (HR = 1.58; 95% CI, 1.33-1.87). When comparing patients with and without mood disorders, they found migraine significantly increased risk for IBS in patients who did not have mood disorders, but did not significantly increase this risk in patients who did have co-existing mood disorders.

The researchers concluded that their results suggest migraine is a risk factor for development of IBS among patients without comorbid mood disorders, whereas patients with comorbid mood disorders experience no significant additional risk for developing IBS associated with migraine. – by Adam Leitenberger

Reference:

Chen Y-Y and Wu M-F. Abstract P1.146. Presented at: American Academy of Neurology Annual Meeting; April 15-21, 2016; Vancouver, British Columbia.

Disclosure: Healio Gastroenterology was unable to confirm the researchers’ relevant financial disclosures at the time of publication.

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