Meeting News Coverage

Infliximab may prevent colectomy among patients with severe ulcerative colitis

Patients with severe ulcerative colitis treated with infliximab may be less likely to require colon resection than those who do not receive infliximab, according to data presented at The American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons Annual Meeting in Phoenix.

Researchers evaluated data from patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) collected from three population-based databases in British Columbia, Canada. Severe UC was identified according to the need for corticosteroids during the evaluated period. Rates of partial or total colectomy among patients with severe UC treated with infliximab were compared with those who did not receive infliximab.

“Approximately 20% of patients with UC will require surgical treatment,” the researchers wrote. “Recent data suggest infliximab may reduce the need for surgery in patients with severe UC. However, it is unclear if data from these small trials will translate to reduced colectomy rates in populations of patients with UC.”

The annual number of UC cases ranged from 3,186 to 5,052 between 2003 and 2010, including 623 to 890 annual cases of severe UC. Infliximab use among patients with severe UC increased from two cases in 2003-2004 to 36 in 2009-2010, while resection rates also increased.

Patients treated with infliximab underwent resection significantly less frequently than those who did not receive infliximab. Surgery was performed in 4.1% of treated patients in 2008-2009 and 11.1% in 2009-2010, compared with 46.6% and 55.7%, respectively, among untreated patients.

“The early study of population-level data suggests that infliximab is associated with lower rates of colectomy in the short term,” the researchers said. “However, further analysis is required to understand the long-term impact of its use.”

For more information:

Moore S. S40: The Impact of Preoperative Infliximab Treatment on Rates of Colectomy in Severe Ulcerative Colitis. Presented at: The American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons Annual Meeting 2013; April 27–May 1, Phoenix.

Patients with severe ulcerative colitis treated with infliximab may be less likely to require colon resection than those who do not receive infliximab, according to data presented at The American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons Annual Meeting in Phoenix.

Researchers evaluated data from patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) collected from three population-based databases in British Columbia, Canada. Severe UC was identified according to the need for corticosteroids during the evaluated period. Rates of partial or total colectomy among patients with severe UC treated with infliximab were compared with those who did not receive infliximab.

“Approximately 20% of patients with UC will require surgical treatment,” the researchers wrote. “Recent data suggest infliximab may reduce the need for surgery in patients with severe UC. However, it is unclear if data from these small trials will translate to reduced colectomy rates in populations of patients with UC.”

The annual number of UC cases ranged from 3,186 to 5,052 between 2003 and 2010, including 623 to 890 annual cases of severe UC. Infliximab use among patients with severe UC increased from two cases in 2003-2004 to 36 in 2009-2010, while resection rates also increased.

Patients treated with infliximab underwent resection significantly less frequently than those who did not receive infliximab. Surgery was performed in 4.1% of treated patients in 2008-2009 and 11.1% in 2009-2010, compared with 46.6% and 55.7%, respectively, among untreated patients.

“The early study of population-level data suggests that infliximab is associated with lower rates of colectomy in the short term,” the researchers said. “However, further analysis is required to understand the long-term impact of its use.”

For more information:

Moore S. S40: The Impact of Preoperative Infliximab Treatment on Rates of Colectomy in Severe Ulcerative Colitis. Presented at: The American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons Annual Meeting 2013; April 27–May 1, Phoenix.

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