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Home infusions of biologics for IBD patients appear safe, cost-effective

LAS VEGAS — Home infusions of biologics appear to be a safe and cost-effective way to reduce the burden of traveling and taking time off from work for some patients with inflammatory bowel disease in the U.S., according to new research presented at the Crohn’s & Colitis Congress.

In fact, Bharati Kochar, MD, of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, and colleagues reported that the median charge for Remicade (infliximab, Janssen) was $500 less, and the median charge for Entyvio (vedolizumab, Takeda) was $3,174 less when administered at home.

“Home infusions of biologic agents appear to be safe for selected patients with inflammatory bowel disease,” Kochar told Healio Gastroenterology and Liver Disease. “Clinicians should be aware of the option as it is cost-effective and it may reduce the burden of infusions to patients.”

Kochar and colleagues performed a retrospective cohort study using claims data spanning January 2010 to June 2016 to compare costs and other factors between patients who received home or standard infusions of biologic therapies. For infliximab, they compared 1,096 patients with Crohn’s disease and 539 with ulcerative colitis who received home infusions vs. 8,392 with Crohn’s disease and 3,718 with ulcerative colitis who received standard infusions. For vedolizumab, they compared 90 patients with Crohn’s disease and 48 with ulcerative colitis who received home infusions vs. 256 with Crohn’s disease and 183 with ulcerative colitis who received standard infusions.

Investigators found the highest prevalence of home infusions in the western region of the U.S., with 20.6% of all infliximab infusions and 49.7% of all vedolizumab infusions being administered at home. The rate of infliximab home infusions also remained stable over time, ranging between 4.7% and 7.2% over the 7-year study period.

Additionally, patients were significantly less likely to require urgent or emergent care visits 2 days after home vs. standard infusion of infliximab (1.4% vs. 3.3%, P < 0.01), but this difference was not significant with vedolizumab (2.2% vs. 2.9%; P = .77).

The median charge for an infliximab infusion was $5,700 when administered at home vs. $6,200 when administered at a treatment center, and for vedolizumab the respective costs were $5,500 vs. $8,674.

“We are doing further work to understand the patient experience with home infusions,” Kochar said. – by Adam Leitenberger

Reference:

Kochar B, et al. P140. Presented at: Crohn’s & Colitis Congress; Jan. 19-20, 2018; Las Vegas, NV.

Disclosures: Kochar reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the full abstract for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.

LAS VEGAS — Home infusions of biologics appear to be a safe and cost-effective way to reduce the burden of traveling and taking time off from work for some patients with inflammatory bowel disease in the U.S., according to new research presented at the Crohn’s & Colitis Congress.

In fact, Bharati Kochar, MD, of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, and colleagues reported that the median charge for Remicade (infliximab, Janssen) was $500 less, and the median charge for Entyvio (vedolizumab, Takeda) was $3,174 less when administered at home.

“Home infusions of biologic agents appear to be safe for selected patients with inflammatory bowel disease,” Kochar told Healio Gastroenterology and Liver Disease. “Clinicians should be aware of the option as it is cost-effective and it may reduce the burden of infusions to patients.”

Kochar and colleagues performed a retrospective cohort study using claims data spanning January 2010 to June 2016 to compare costs and other factors between patients who received home or standard infusions of biologic therapies. For infliximab, they compared 1,096 patients with Crohn’s disease and 539 with ulcerative colitis who received home infusions vs. 8,392 with Crohn’s disease and 3,718 with ulcerative colitis who received standard infusions. For vedolizumab, they compared 90 patients with Crohn’s disease and 48 with ulcerative colitis who received home infusions vs. 256 with Crohn’s disease and 183 with ulcerative colitis who received standard infusions.

Investigators found the highest prevalence of home infusions in the western region of the U.S., with 20.6% of all infliximab infusions and 49.7% of all vedolizumab infusions being administered at home. The rate of infliximab home infusions also remained stable over time, ranging between 4.7% and 7.2% over the 7-year study period.

Additionally, patients were significantly less likely to require urgent or emergent care visits 2 days after home vs. standard infusion of infliximab (1.4% vs. 3.3%, P < 0.01), but this difference was not significant with vedolizumab (2.2% vs. 2.9%; P = .77).

The median charge for an infliximab infusion was $5,700 when administered at home vs. $6,200 when administered at a treatment center, and for vedolizumab the respective costs were $5,500 vs. $8,674.

“We are doing further work to understand the patient experience with home infusions,” Kochar said. – by Adam Leitenberger

Reference:

Kochar B, et al. P140. Presented at: Crohn’s & Colitis Congress; Jan. 19-20, 2018; Las Vegas, NV.

Disclosures: Kochar reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the full abstract for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.

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