Meeting News Coverage

IBD patients have poor disease-related knowledge, regardless of education level

ORLANDO — Patients attending an outpatient IBD program demonstrated poor disease-related knowledge regardless of their education level, according to a presentation in the nursing track at the 2015 Advances in IBD Meeting.

To evaluate disease-related knowledge levels and associated factors, Daniela Simian, RN, from Clinica Las Condes in Santiago, Chile, and colleagues performed a prospective study of 203 adult IBD patients who presented to their outpatient IBD program between October 2014 and July 2015. Patients completed the Crohn’s and Colitis Knowledge (CCKNOW) score questionnaire and a demographic and clinical questionnaire.

The cohort was composed of 62% women and 66% were UC patients with a median age of 34 years (range, 18-79 years) and a median disease duration of 4 years. University or postgraduate education was reported by 58% and 68% were employed. Overall, 41% were receiving 5-aminosalicylic acid treatment and 30% were on immunomodulators.

The median CCKNOW score was 9 (range, 1-20), 71% of patients were unable to provide correct answers to more than half of the questions, and fewer than 20% were able to provide correct answers to questions related to pregnancy and fertility or surgery and complications. Notably, there was no association observed between education level and disease-related knowledge, but CCKNOW scores were lower among patients aged older than 50 years (median score, 8 vs. 9.5; P = .033), UC patients (9 vs. 11; P = .017), patients with disease duration shorter than 5 years (9 vs. 10; P = .045) and patients who did not undergo surgery for IBD (9 vs. 11.5; P = .004).

The poor disease-related knowledge among this cohort is comparable to levels observed in developed countries, the researchers concluded. Assessments of disease-related knowledge among patients is necessary for developing educational interventions and evaluating their impact in terms of patient compliance and quality of life, they wrote. – by Adam Leitenberger

Reference: Simian D, et al. Abstract O-025. Presented at Advances in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases; Dec. 10-12, 2015; Orlando, Fla.

Disclosures: Healio Gastroenterology was unable to confirm relevant financial disclosures at the time of publication.

ORLANDO — Patients attending an outpatient IBD program demonstrated poor disease-related knowledge regardless of their education level, according to a presentation in the nursing track at the 2015 Advances in IBD Meeting.

To evaluate disease-related knowledge levels and associated factors, Daniela Simian, RN, from Clinica Las Condes in Santiago, Chile, and colleagues performed a prospective study of 203 adult IBD patients who presented to their outpatient IBD program between October 2014 and July 2015. Patients completed the Crohn’s and Colitis Knowledge (CCKNOW) score questionnaire and a demographic and clinical questionnaire.

The cohort was composed of 62% women and 66% were UC patients with a median age of 34 years (range, 18-79 years) and a median disease duration of 4 years. University or postgraduate education was reported by 58% and 68% were employed. Overall, 41% were receiving 5-aminosalicylic acid treatment and 30% were on immunomodulators.

The median CCKNOW score was 9 (range, 1-20), 71% of patients were unable to provide correct answers to more than half of the questions, and fewer than 20% were able to provide correct answers to questions related to pregnancy and fertility or surgery and complications. Notably, there was no association observed between education level and disease-related knowledge, but CCKNOW scores were lower among patients aged older than 50 years (median score, 8 vs. 9.5; P = .033), UC patients (9 vs. 11; P = .017), patients with disease duration shorter than 5 years (9 vs. 10; P = .045) and patients who did not undergo surgery for IBD (9 vs. 11.5; P = .004).

The poor disease-related knowledge among this cohort is comparable to levels observed in developed countries, the researchers concluded. Assessments of disease-related knowledge among patients is necessary for developing educational interventions and evaluating their impact in terms of patient compliance and quality of life, they wrote. – by Adam Leitenberger

Reference: Simian D, et al. Abstract O-025. Presented at Advances in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases; Dec. 10-12, 2015; Orlando, Fla.

Disclosures: Healio Gastroenterology was unable to confirm relevant financial disclosures at the time of publication.

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