In the Journals

Psoriasis linked to increased risk for Crohn’s, ulcerative colitis

Patients with psoriasis are increasingly linked to risks for Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis and a combination of the two diseases, according to a review study published in JAMA Dermatology.

“We found that patients with psoriasis were prone to have comorbid IBD,” Yen Fu, MD, and colleagues wrote. “The possible explanations for the identified association of psoriasis with IBD include genetic abnormalities, immune dysfunction, systemic inflammation, and dysregulation of gut microbiota.”

Fu and colleagues analyzed five case-control or cross-sectional studies and four cohort studies, totaling 7,794,087 study participants. The systematic review and meta-analysis included relevant studies through January 17, 2018.

They found associations between psoriasis and CD (OR = 1.7; 95% CI, 1.2-2.4) and between psoriasis and UC (OR = 1.75; 95% CI, 1.49-2.05). When psoriasis was present, patients had an increased risk for CD (RR = 2.53; 95% CI, 1.65-3.89) and UC (RR = 1.71; 95% CI, 1.55-1.89).

Additionally, the researchers looked at participants with psoriatic arthritis and, through the meta-analysis, found a significantly increased risk for CD (RR, 2.74; 95% CI, 1.41-5.32) and a nonsignificant increase in the risk for UC (RR, 1.74; 95% CI, 0.72-4.17) in patients with psoriatic arthritis.

“The evidence to date supports an association of psoriasis with IBD. Patients with psoriasis should be informed about the increased risk of IBD. Gastroenterology consultation is indicated for patients with psoriasis presenting with bowel symptoms,” the researchers concluded. – by Katrina Altersitz

Disclosures: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

Patients with psoriasis are increasingly linked to risks for Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis and a combination of the two diseases, according to a review study published in JAMA Dermatology.

“We found that patients with psoriasis were prone to have comorbid IBD,” Yen Fu, MD, and colleagues wrote. “The possible explanations for the identified association of psoriasis with IBD include genetic abnormalities, immune dysfunction, systemic inflammation, and dysregulation of gut microbiota.”

Fu and colleagues analyzed five case-control or cross-sectional studies and four cohort studies, totaling 7,794,087 study participants. The systematic review and meta-analysis included relevant studies through January 17, 2018.

They found associations between psoriasis and CD (OR = 1.7; 95% CI, 1.2-2.4) and between psoriasis and UC (OR = 1.75; 95% CI, 1.49-2.05). When psoriasis was present, patients had an increased risk for CD (RR = 2.53; 95% CI, 1.65-3.89) and UC (RR = 1.71; 95% CI, 1.55-1.89).

Additionally, the researchers looked at participants with psoriatic arthritis and, through the meta-analysis, found a significantly increased risk for CD (RR, 2.74; 95% CI, 1.41-5.32) and a nonsignificant increase in the risk for UC (RR, 1.74; 95% CI, 0.72-4.17) in patients with psoriatic arthritis.

“The evidence to date supports an association of psoriasis with IBD. Patients with psoriasis should be informed about the increased risk of IBD. Gastroenterology consultation is indicated for patients with psoriasis presenting with bowel symptoms,” the researchers concluded. – by Katrina Altersitz

Disclosures: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.