In the Journals

Patients with IBD at increased risk for myocardial infarction

Patients with Crohn’s disease are at higher risk for myocardial infarction than the general population, according to study results.

Dong Ho Lee, of the department of internal medicine at Seoul National University, Bundang Hospital in South Korea, and colleagues wrote that the risk was stronger among women older than 40 years, and women with ulcerative colitis were also at increased risk.

“Inflammation plays an important role in coronary heart disease by triggering atherosclerosisrelated processes, from plaque formation to thrombus rupture,” they wrote. “While IBD is an established risk factor for venous thromboembolism, its potential association with the development of coronary heart disease and stroke has been highlighted only recently.”

Researchers used claim codes to identify patients diagnosed with IBD between 2006 and 2009 (10,708 with CD; 26,769 with UC) and matched them with individuals without IBD. They calculated risk for the three primary outcomes of myocardial infarction, stroke and death.

Lee and colleagues found that patients with CD had a higher risk for myocardial infarction than controls (incidence ratio = 1.64 per 1,000 person-years; HR = 1.8; 95% CI, 1.47–2.21). The risk was more prominent among patients older than 40 years (IR = 0.69 per 1,000 person-years; HR = 2.96; 95% CI, 1.96–2.94) and among women (IR = 2.35 per 1,000 person-years; HR = 2.18; 95% CI, 1.61–2.94).

Additionally, researchers found that women with UC, but not men, were at higher risk for myocardial infarction (IR = 2.01 per 1,000 person-years; HR = 1.33; 95% CI, 1.13–1.56).

“Patients with CD have a higher risk of [myocardial infarction] and mortality than noted in the general population,” Lee and colleagues wrote. “The higher risk of [myocardial infarction] in female IBD patients than in male patients and diseases-specific mortality among IBD patients should be further studied in the future.” by Alex Young

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

Patients with Crohn’s disease are at higher risk for myocardial infarction than the general population, according to study results.

Dong Ho Lee, of the department of internal medicine at Seoul National University, Bundang Hospital in South Korea, and colleagues wrote that the risk was stronger among women older than 40 years, and women with ulcerative colitis were also at increased risk.

“Inflammation plays an important role in coronary heart disease by triggering atherosclerosisrelated processes, from plaque formation to thrombus rupture,” they wrote. “While IBD is an established risk factor for venous thromboembolism, its potential association with the development of coronary heart disease and stroke has been highlighted only recently.”

Researchers used claim codes to identify patients diagnosed with IBD between 2006 and 2009 (10,708 with CD; 26,769 with UC) and matched them with individuals without IBD. They calculated risk for the three primary outcomes of myocardial infarction, stroke and death.

Lee and colleagues found that patients with CD had a higher risk for myocardial infarction than controls (incidence ratio = 1.64 per 1,000 person-years; HR = 1.8; 95% CI, 1.47–2.21). The risk was more prominent among patients older than 40 years (IR = 0.69 per 1,000 person-years; HR = 2.96; 95% CI, 1.96–2.94) and among women (IR = 2.35 per 1,000 person-years; HR = 2.18; 95% CI, 1.61–2.94).

Additionally, researchers found that women with UC, but not men, were at higher risk for myocardial infarction (IR = 2.01 per 1,000 person-years; HR = 1.33; 95% CI, 1.13–1.56).

“Patients with CD have a higher risk of [myocardial infarction] and mortality than noted in the general population,” Lee and colleagues wrote. “The higher risk of [myocardial infarction] in female IBD patients than in male patients and diseases-specific mortality among IBD patients should be further studied in the future.” by Alex Young

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.