Sherman Prize honors researchers for their work in Crohn’s, UC

The Bruce and Cynthia Sherman Charitable Foundation has announced the 2017 recipients of the Sherman Prize for their research in the treatment of Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.

The honorees include Stephan R. Targan, MD, director of the Inflammatory Bowel and Immunobiology Research Institute at Cedars-Sinai; Lee A. Denson, MD, director of the Schubert-Martin IBD Center at the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center; and Heidi Drescher, MMS, PA-C, from the Community Physician Group at Community Medical Center in Missoula, Montana.

Targan and Denson each received $100,000 for creating innovative care models that have helped improve the health of people with inflammatory bowel disease, while Drescher received $25,000 for ensuring rural, vulnerable patients benefit from the best practices in IBD care.

“Each [recipient] works tirelessly, in their own way, to push the boundaries of science and medicine and change what is ‘accepted practice’ to improve the quality of life of people living with IBD,” Bruce Sherman, founder of the Sherman Prize, and chairman and CEO of M4 Capital, said in the release. “I am thankful to these pioneers and proud to honor and reward their outstanding contributions to the field of IBD.”

Disclosures: Sherman is employed by M4 Capital.

The Bruce and Cynthia Sherman Charitable Foundation has announced the 2017 recipients of the Sherman Prize for their research in the treatment of Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.

The honorees include Stephan R. Targan, MD, director of the Inflammatory Bowel and Immunobiology Research Institute at Cedars-Sinai; Lee A. Denson, MD, director of the Schubert-Martin IBD Center at the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center; and Heidi Drescher, MMS, PA-C, from the Community Physician Group at Community Medical Center in Missoula, Montana.

Targan and Denson each received $100,000 for creating innovative care models that have helped improve the health of people with inflammatory bowel disease, while Drescher received $25,000 for ensuring rural, vulnerable patients benefit from the best practices in IBD care.

“Each [recipient] works tirelessly, in their own way, to push the boundaries of science and medicine and change what is ‘accepted practice’ to improve the quality of life of people living with IBD,” Bruce Sherman, founder of the Sherman Prize, and chairman and CEO of M4 Capital, said in the release. “I am thankful to these pioneers and proud to honor and reward their outstanding contributions to the field of IBD.”

Disclosures: Sherman is employed by M4 Capital.

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