Meeting NewsVideo

VIDEO: ’Tying it all together’ in IBD – microbiome, diet and brain

LAS VEGAS — In this exclusive video from Crohn’s & Colitis Congress 2019, Joel R. Rosh, MD, director of pediatric gastroenterology at Goryeb Children’s Hospital, discusses some of the main takeaways from the meeting.

Rosh, who is also a professor of pediatrics at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, noted that one of the sessions he attended focused on nutrition, which according to him, is something that patients are most interested in.

“Probably the best model for the fact that diet really does affect these diseases, is from pediatrics,” he told Healio Gastroenterology and Liver Disease. “We know for a long time that we can induce a steroid-free remission in Crohn’s disease using an elemental diet. If I take out all food, and only give formula, the gut goes into complete mucosal healing. For a long time, we thought it was the magic of formula. We’ve learned it’s not, it’s taking out of the diet whatever is toxic to the bowel.”

Additionally, Rosh highlighted the meeting’s emphasis of connecting the microbiome, diet and the brain during various sessions.

“Very exciting kind of research looking at the microbiome, looking at diet and tying it all together with the brain,” he said. “A lot of data was presented [as to] how stress, anxiety and the brain itself functions to affect the immune system in the gut, and the microbiome. So, from top to bottom, from brain to gut, we’re learning how to better care for our patients ... how do we take care of the whole patient, let’s take the science to the office and let’s look at psychosocial wellness and health maintenance as well as keeping the bowel in true total remission.”

Disclosure: Rosh reports serving as a consultant for, and on advisory committees or review panels with AbbVie, Celgene, Janssen, Luitpold and Pfizer.

LAS VEGAS — In this exclusive video from Crohn’s & Colitis Congress 2019, Joel R. Rosh, MD, director of pediatric gastroenterology at Goryeb Children’s Hospital, discusses some of the main takeaways from the meeting.

Rosh, who is also a professor of pediatrics at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, noted that one of the sessions he attended focused on nutrition, which according to him, is something that patients are most interested in.

“Probably the best model for the fact that diet really does affect these diseases, is from pediatrics,” he told Healio Gastroenterology and Liver Disease. “We know for a long time that we can induce a steroid-free remission in Crohn’s disease using an elemental diet. If I take out all food, and only give formula, the gut goes into complete mucosal healing. For a long time, we thought it was the magic of formula. We’ve learned it’s not, it’s taking out of the diet whatever is toxic to the bowel.”

Additionally, Rosh highlighted the meeting’s emphasis of connecting the microbiome, diet and the brain during various sessions.

“Very exciting kind of research looking at the microbiome, looking at diet and tying it all together with the brain,” he said. “A lot of data was presented [as to] how stress, anxiety and the brain itself functions to affect the immune system in the gut, and the microbiome. So, from top to bottom, from brain to gut, we’re learning how to better care for our patients ... how do we take care of the whole patient, let’s take the science to the office and let’s look at psychosocial wellness and health maintenance as well as keeping the bowel in true total remission.”

Disclosure: Rosh reports serving as a consultant for, and on advisory committees or review panels with AbbVie, Celgene, Janssen, Luitpold and Pfizer.

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