15 IBD updates to mark Crohn’s & Colitis Awareness Week

December 1 to December 7 marks Crohn’s & Colitis Awareness Week. First created by U.S. Senate Resolution 199 in November 2011, this national initiative aims to express appreciation for the family members, caregivers, health professionals and researchers who support patients with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, and also seeks to bring the IBD community together in a shared goal of educating the public about inflammatory bowel disease.

This week, the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation is helping to spread awareness by inviting patients to share their stories on Twitter using #myIBD and #IBDVisible.

To contribute to this awareness initiative, the editors of Healio Gastroenterology and Liver Disease have compiled 15 recent updates in IBD research and patient care covered by Healio.com.

1. FDA grants orphan designation to microbiome drug for pediatric UC

Seres Therapeutics announced the FDA has given its microbiome drug candidate SER-287 Orphan Drug Designation for the treatment of pediatric ulcerative colitis. Read more

2. ‘Tight control’ of inflammatory biomarkers improves outcomes in Crohn’s disease

A treat-to-target strategy using “tight control” of inflammatory biomarkers in addition to clinical symptom monitoring led to improved outcomes in patients with Crohn’s disease on Humira, according to data from the CALM study presented at UEG Week. Read more

3. Heavy use of prescription opiates for IBD may increase mortality rates

Heavy use of opiates among patients with inflammatory bowel disease correlated with increased rates of all-cause premature mortality, according to a recently published study. Read more

4. Older IBD patients less often treated w ith biologics, immunomodulators

Patients diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease at age 60 years or older were more likely to receive treatment with corticosteroids rather than biologics or immunomodulators compared with those diagnosed at a younger age, according to new research published in Gastroenterology. Read more

5. IBD patients with depression, anxiety at risk for medical non-compliance

Psychiatric comorbidities, like anxiety or depression, significantly increase the risk for medical non-compliance in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, and may worsen disease course, according to research presented at Advances in IBD 2017. Read more

6. NIH funds research on exactly how TNF drives IBD

The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the NIH has provided $1.5 million to fund research to determine exactly how the cell signaling protein tumor necrosis factor contributes to inflammatory bowel disease. Read more

7. Remicade biosimilar Inflectra shows safety, efficacy through 1 year in IBD

Patients with inflammatory bowel disease who switched from Remicade to its biosimilar Inflectra or maintained therapy through 1 year, showed comparable safety, efficacy and tolerability, according to new research presented at UEG Week. Read more

8. IBD patients on thiopurines, anti-TNFs show ‘small but significant’ lymphoma risk

Patients with inflammatory bowel disease who used thiopurines or anti-tumor necrosis factor agents showed a “small but statistically significant” increase in their risk for lymphoma, according to new research published in JAMA. Notably, lymphoma risk was higher when patients used thiopurines and anti-TNFs in combination. Read more

9. The IBD medical home: a holistic approach to specialty care

Miguel D. Regueiro, MD, senior medical lead of Specialty Medical Homes at UPMC’s division of gastroenterology, hepatology, and nutrition, spoke with Healio Gastroenterology and Liver Disease about the emerging concept of the subspecialty medical home, how it can benefit patients, and the attitudes of gastroenterologists about such a shift. Read more

10. Targeting early goals of mental health improves outcomes in IBD

Identifying and targeting early indicators of possible mental health distress allows physicians to elicit better overall outcomes from their patients with inflammatory bowel disease, according to Laurie A. Keefer, PhD, director of psychobehavioral research within the division of gastroenterology at Mount Sinai Health System, who recently gave a talk at at Advances in IBD 2017. Read more

11. Biologics safer, more cost-effective than corticosteroids long term in IBD

Biologic medications, although initially costlier, were more cost-effective, safer and beneficial in the long term than oral corticosteroids for treating patients with inflammatory bowel disease, according to a poster presentation at Advances in IBD 2017. Read more

12. Colonoscopy complications more likely in patients with IBD

Patients with inflammatory bowel disease were significantly more likely to have complications after colonoscopy than patients without IBD, according to a poster presentation at Advances in IBD 2017. These findings led investigators to recommend using noninvasive strategies as an alternative to colonoscopy in high-risk patients. Read more

13. Cannabis use in IBD needs to be an ‘open discussion’ without prejudice

To best treat patients for inflammatory bowel disease, providers need to know the status of cannabis use, and they must approach the conversation without prejudice, according to a presenter at Advances in IBD 2017. Read more

14. Etrolizumab shows promise in Crohn’s disease

Etrolizumab, a dual-action, gut-selective anti-integrin antibody, led to endoscopic and symptom improvements in patients with moderate-to-severe Crohn’s disease in the phase 3 BERGAMOT trial, according to a poster presentation at Advances in IBD 2017. Read more

15. IPAA surgery safe in older IBD patients

Patients with inflammatory bowel disease aged older than 50 years showed similar outcomes as younger patients after ileal pouch anal anastomosis surgery, according to a poster presentation at Advances in IBD 2017. Read more

December 1 to December 7 marks Crohn’s & Colitis Awareness Week. First created by U.S. Senate Resolution 199 in November 2011, this national initiative aims to express appreciation for the family members, caregivers, health professionals and researchers who support patients with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, and also seeks to bring the IBD community together in a shared goal of educating the public about inflammatory bowel disease.

This week, the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation is helping to spread awareness by inviting patients to share their stories on Twitter using #myIBD and #IBDVisible.

To contribute to this awareness initiative, the editors of Healio Gastroenterology and Liver Disease have compiled 15 recent updates in IBD research and patient care covered by Healio.com.

1. FDA grants orphan designation to microbiome drug for pediatric UC

Seres Therapeutics announced the FDA has given its microbiome drug candidate SER-287 Orphan Drug Designation for the treatment of pediatric ulcerative colitis. Read more

2. ‘Tight control’ of inflammatory biomarkers improves outcomes in Crohn’s disease

A treat-to-target strategy using “tight control” of inflammatory biomarkers in addition to clinical symptom monitoring led to improved outcomes in patients with Crohn’s disease on Humira, according to data from the CALM study presented at UEG Week. Read more

3. Heavy use of prescription opiates for IBD may increase mortality rates

Heavy use of opiates among patients with inflammatory bowel disease correlated with increased rates of all-cause premature mortality, according to a recently published study. Read more

4. Older IBD patients less often treated w ith biologics, immunomodulators

Patients diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease at age 60 years or older were more likely to receive treatment with corticosteroids rather than biologics or immunomodulators compared with those diagnosed at a younger age, according to new research published in Gastroenterology. Read more

5. IBD patients with depression, anxiety at risk for medical non-compliance

Psychiatric comorbidities, like anxiety or depression, significantly increase the risk for medical non-compliance in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, and may worsen disease course, according to research presented at Advances in IBD 2017. Read more

6. NIH funds research on exactly how TNF drives IBD

The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the NIH has provided $1.5 million to fund research to determine exactly how the cell signaling protein tumor necrosis factor contributes to inflammatory bowel disease. Read more

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7. Remicade biosimilar Inflectra shows safety, efficacy through 1 year in IBD

Patients with inflammatory bowel disease who switched from Remicade to its biosimilar Inflectra or maintained therapy through 1 year, showed comparable safety, efficacy and tolerability, according to new research presented at UEG Week. Read more

8. IBD patients on thiopurines, anti-TNFs show ‘small but significant’ lymphoma risk

Patients with inflammatory bowel disease who used thiopurines or anti-tumor necrosis factor agents showed a “small but statistically significant” increase in their risk for lymphoma, according to new research published in JAMA. Notably, lymphoma risk was higher when patients used thiopurines and anti-TNFs in combination. Read more

9. The IBD medical home: a holistic approach to specialty care

Miguel D. Regueiro, MD, senior medical lead of Specialty Medical Homes at UPMC’s division of gastroenterology, hepatology, and nutrition, spoke with Healio Gastroenterology and Liver Disease about the emerging concept of the subspecialty medical home, how it can benefit patients, and the attitudes of gastroenterologists about such a shift. Read more

10. Targeting early goals of mental health improves outcomes in IBD

Identifying and targeting early indicators of possible mental health distress allows physicians to elicit better overall outcomes from their patients with inflammatory bowel disease, according to Laurie A. Keefer, PhD, director of psychobehavioral research within the division of gastroenterology at Mount Sinai Health System, who recently gave a talk at at Advances in IBD 2017. Read more

11. Biologics safer, more cost-effective than corticosteroids long term in IBD

Biologic medications, although initially costlier, were more cost-effective, safer and beneficial in the long term than oral corticosteroids for treating patients with inflammatory bowel disease, according to a poster presentation at Advances in IBD 2017. Read more

12. Colonoscopy complications more likely in patients with IBD

Patients with inflammatory bowel disease were significantly more likely to have complications after colonoscopy than patients without IBD, according to a poster presentation at Advances in IBD 2017. These findings led investigators to recommend using noninvasive strategies as an alternative to colonoscopy in high-risk patients. Read more

13. Cannabis use in IBD needs to be an ‘open discussion’ without prejudice

To best treat patients for inflammatory bowel disease, providers need to know the status of cannabis use, and they must approach the conversation without prejudice, according to a presenter at Advances in IBD 2017. Read more

14. Etrolizumab shows promise in Crohn’s disease

Etrolizumab, a dual-action, gut-selective anti-integrin antibody, led to endoscopic and symptom improvements in patients with moderate-to-severe Crohn’s disease in the phase 3 BERGAMOT trial, according to a poster presentation at Advances in IBD 2017. Read more

15. IPAA surgery safe in older IBD patients

Patients with inflammatory bowel disease aged older than 50 years showed similar outcomes as younger patients after ileal pouch anal anastomosis surgery, according to a poster presentation at Advances in IBD 2017. Read more

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