12 updates to mark C. difficile Infection Awareness Month

The state of Minnesota has officially designated November as C. difficile Infection Awareness Month as part of ongoing efforts to prevent and treat this common health care-associated infection, which causes more than 500,000 infections and 29,000 deaths annually in the U.S.

“The ability to prevent and potentially eradicate recurrent C. diff infection requires leadership from across the landscape of health care, from government institutions to advocacy to academia to emerging biotechnology companies,” Nancy Caralla, founder of the C Diff Foundation, said in a press release. “We commend the State of Minnesota [as it] seeks to play an important role in reducing the rate and impact of C. diff infection.”

To contribute to these awareness efforts, the editors of Healio Gastroenterology and Liver Disease compiled 12 recent updates in C. difficile infection covered on Healio.com.

1. Patients often change behavior after recurrent C. difficile infection

Many patients who have had repeated C. difficile infections change their behaviors in hopes of preventing future infection, according to findings recently published in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology. Read more

2. C. difficile persists most frequently in floor corners after disinfection

C. difficile persists most frequently in floor corners and on bathroom floors after routine and terminal cleaning of hospital rooms, recent study findings showed. Read more

3. FMT capsules noninferior to colonoscopy in preventing recurrent C. difficile

New findings published in JAMA suggest that fecal microbiota transplantation via oral capsules is noninferior to delivery by colonoscopy in preventing recurrent C. difficile infection. Read more

4. Zinplava cost-effective for preventing recurrent CDI

Zinplava, administered concurrently with antibiotics, was cost-effective in the prevention of recurrent C. difficile infection, compared with placebo, according to findings published in Clinical Infectious Diseases. Read more

5. Tetracyclines may reduce risk for C. difficile

Use of tetracyclines was associated with a decreased risk for C. difficile infection, a meta-analysis found. Read more

6. Overall antibiotic use linked to C. difficile in U.S. hospitals

A CDC study of more than 500 U.S. hospitals showed overall inpatient antibiotic use correlated with increased rates of hospital-onset C. difficile infection, or HO-CDI. Read more

7. Dose-escalation in IBD after CDI does not increase adverse outcomes risk

Initiating immunosuppressive medication following treatment for C. difficile infection was not correlated with adverse clinical outcomes in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, according to a presenter at ACG. Read more

8. Antibiotics for dental procedures linked to C. difficile infection

Researchers in Minnesota identified a potentially overlooked source of C. difficile infection: antibiotics prescribed by dentists. Read more

9. Probiotic hospital protocol fails to show protective effect against C. difficile

An automatic probiotic protocol at a community hospital, in which a course of Saccharomyces boulardii was given to all adults treated with antibiotics, did not protect against C. difficile infection, according to data presented at IDWeek. Read more

10. Patient handwashing cuts C. difficile rate in hospital

Education on patient hand hygiene significantly reduced the incidence of C. difficile infection at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Mercy Hospital. Read more

11. Antibiotic use, C. difficile increase under electronic sepsis protocol

The implementation of an electronic sepsis protocol coincided with greater use of broad-spectrum antibiotics and an increase of C. difficile infections at a teaching hospital, according to recently published findings. Read more

12. Surotomycin meets non-inferiority endpoint, fails to show benefit over vancomycin in C. difficile

A similar proportion of patients with C. difficile infection showed clinical response at the end of treatment with surotomycin vs. vancomycin in a pivotal phase 3 trial. Read more

The state of Minnesota has officially designated November as C. difficile Infection Awareness Month as part of ongoing efforts to prevent and treat this common health care-associated infection, which causes more than 500,000 infections and 29,000 deaths annually in the U.S.

“The ability to prevent and potentially eradicate recurrent C. diff infection requires leadership from across the landscape of health care, from government institutions to advocacy to academia to emerging biotechnology companies,” Nancy Caralla, founder of the C Diff Foundation, said in a press release. “We commend the State of Minnesota [as it] seeks to play an important role in reducing the rate and impact of C. diff infection.”

To contribute to these awareness efforts, the editors of Healio Gastroenterology and Liver Disease compiled 12 recent updates in C. difficile infection covered on Healio.com.

1. Patients often change behavior after recurrent C. difficile infection

Many patients who have had repeated C. difficile infections change their behaviors in hopes of preventing future infection, according to findings recently published in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology. Read more

2. C. difficile persists most frequently in floor corners after disinfection

C. difficile persists most frequently in floor corners and on bathroom floors after routine and terminal cleaning of hospital rooms, recent study findings showed. Read more

3. FMT capsules noninferior to colonoscopy in preventing recurrent C. difficile

New findings published in JAMA suggest that fecal microbiota transplantation via oral capsules is noninferior to delivery by colonoscopy in preventing recurrent C. difficile infection. Read more

4. Zinplava cost-effective for preventing recurrent CDI

Zinplava, administered concurrently with antibiotics, was cost-effective in the prevention of recurrent C. difficile infection, compared with placebo, according to findings published in Clinical Infectious Diseases. Read more

5. Tetracyclines may reduce risk for C. difficile

Use of tetracyclines was associated with a decreased risk for C. difficile infection, a meta-analysis found. Read more

6. Overall antibiotic use linked to C. difficile in U.S. hospitals

A CDC study of more than 500 U.S. hospitals showed overall inpatient antibiotic use correlated with increased rates of hospital-onset C. difficile infection, or HO-CDI. Read more

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7. Dose-escalation in IBD after CDI does not increase adverse outcomes risk

Initiating immunosuppressive medication following treatment for C. difficile infection was not correlated with adverse clinical outcomes in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, according to a presenter at ACG. Read more

8. Antibiotics for dental procedures linked to C. difficile infection

Researchers in Minnesota identified a potentially overlooked source of C. difficile infection: antibiotics prescribed by dentists. Read more

9. Probiotic hospital protocol fails to show protective effect against C. difficile

An automatic probiotic protocol at a community hospital, in which a course of Saccharomyces boulardii was given to all adults treated with antibiotics, did not protect against C. difficile infection, according to data presented at IDWeek. Read more

10. Patient handwashing cuts C. difficile rate in hospital

Education on patient hand hygiene significantly reduced the incidence of C. difficile infection at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Mercy Hospital. Read more

11. Antibiotic use, C. difficile increase under electronic sepsis protocol

The implementation of an electronic sepsis protocol coincided with greater use of broad-spectrum antibiotics and an increase of C. difficile infections at a teaching hospital, according to recently published findings. Read more

12. Surotomycin meets non-inferiority endpoint, fails to show benefit over vancomycin in C. difficile

A similar proportion of patients with C. difficile infection showed clinical response at the end of treatment with surotomycin vs. vancomycin in a pivotal phase 3 trial. Read more

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