In the Journals

7 recent reports on the gut microbiome

Healio Gastroenterology and Liver Disease presents the following reports on the most recent research and news on the gut microbiome.

These reports review a variety of relevant topics from FDA enforcement on fecal microbiota transplantation to how certain medications can change the composition of the microbiome.

Lactulose breath test predicts Xifaxan response in IBS-D

Patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome who had a positive baseline result from a lactulose breath test were more likely to respond to Xifaxan therapy, according to results of open-label study.

Ali Rezaie , MD, medical director of the GI motility program at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, and colleagues wrote that like other IBS therapies, Xifaxan (rifaximin, Salix) can be effective, but the ability to determine response is limited. READ MORE

‘Super donor’ FMT effective in IBS

Fecal microbiota transplantation is an effective treatment for patients with irritable bowel syndrome, but the fecal sample must come from a “super donor,” according to study results presented at UEG Week.

“Microbiota dysbiosis is thought to play an important role in the pathophysiology of IBS,” Magdy El-Salhy, MD, PhD, professor of gastroenterology and hepatology at Bergen University in Norway, said in a press release. “However, previous studies investigating FMT in this condition have produced conflicting results.” READ MORE

FMT decreases mortality in severe, fulminant C. diff

Compared with standard of care, fecal microbiota transplantation decreases mortality among patients with severe and fulminant Clostridioides difficile infection, according to study results.

Ari M. Grispan , MD, of the division of gastroenterology at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and colleagues wrote that few advances have been made in the treatment of severe and fulminant CDI, a condition associated with poor long-term outcomes. READ MORE

Common medications linked to changes in gut microbiome

A group of commonly used drug categories have a significant impact on the makeup of the gut microbiome, which could increase the risk for infection, obesity and other conditions, according to study results presented at UEG Week.

Arnau Vich Vila, of the department of gastroenterology and hepatology at University Medical Center Groningen in the Netherlands, and colleagues found that 18 common drug categories were associated with changes in the composition or function of the gut microbiome. Their research explored changes in the general population, as well as in patients with disorders like inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome. READ MORE

International consensus provides guidance on role of stool banks

Experts on fecal microbiota transplantation from Europe, North America and Australia have released a new consensus report that provides guidance on how to establish, operate and regulate stool banks.

Monika Fischer, MD, MS, a gastroenterologist at Indiana University Health, told Healio Gastroenterology and Liver Disease that the group made up of more than 30 experts began planning more than a year ago. They sought to build on previous FMT guidelines by providing recommendations specifically to address the operation of stool banks and the distribution of fecal samples. READ MORE

FDA hears testimony on enforcement discretion of FMT for C. diff

The FDA held a public comment session on Monday in Washington, D.C., to hear testimony on the agency’s policy on enforcement discretion of fecal microbiota transplantation for patients with recurrent Clostridioides difficile infection, as well as what is needed to make a path forward toward approval.

Manufacturers, researchers, clinicians and patients were on hand to discuss how the policy has impacted everything from enrollment in clinical trials to the actual management of sick patients. READ MORE

Guest commentary: FMT, ‘a life-saving therapy,’ needs physician, industry cooperation

In this guest commentary, Jessica Allegretti, MD, MPH, of the Brigham and Women’s Hospital Crohn’s and Colitis Center, discusses the recent FDA hearing on the agency’s policy of enforcement discretion of fecal microbiota transplantation for recurrent Clostridioides difficile infection. READ MORE

Healio Gastroenterology and Liver Disease presents the following reports on the most recent research and news on the gut microbiome.

These reports review a variety of relevant topics from FDA enforcement on fecal microbiota transplantation to how certain medications can change the composition of the microbiome.

Lactulose breath test predicts Xifaxan response in IBS-D

Patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome who had a positive baseline result from a lactulose breath test were more likely to respond to Xifaxan therapy, according to results of open-label study.

Ali Rezaie , MD, medical director of the GI motility program at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, and colleagues wrote that like other IBS therapies, Xifaxan (rifaximin, Salix) can be effective, but the ability to determine response is limited. READ MORE

‘Super donor’ FMT effective in IBS

Fecal microbiota transplantation is an effective treatment for patients with irritable bowel syndrome, but the fecal sample must come from a “super donor,” according to study results presented at UEG Week.

“Microbiota dysbiosis is thought to play an important role in the pathophysiology of IBS,” Magdy El-Salhy, MD, PhD, professor of gastroenterology and hepatology at Bergen University in Norway, said in a press release. “However, previous studies investigating FMT in this condition have produced conflicting results.” READ MORE

FMT decreases mortality in severe, fulminant C. diff

Compared with standard of care, fecal microbiota transplantation decreases mortality among patients with severe and fulminant Clostridioides difficile infection, according to study results.

Ari M. Grispan , MD, of the division of gastroenterology at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and colleagues wrote that few advances have been made in the treatment of severe and fulminant CDI, a condition associated with poor long-term outcomes. READ MORE

Common medications linked to changes in gut microbiome

A group of commonly used drug categories have a significant impact on the makeup of the gut microbiome, which could increase the risk for infection, obesity and other conditions, according to study results presented at UEG Week.

Arnau Vich Vila, of the department of gastroenterology and hepatology at University Medical Center Groningen in the Netherlands, and colleagues found that 18 common drug categories were associated with changes in the composition or function of the gut microbiome. Their research explored changes in the general population, as well as in patients with disorders like inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome. READ MORE

International consensus provides guidance on role of stool banks

Experts on fecal microbiota transplantation from Europe, North America and Australia have released a new consensus report that provides guidance on how to establish, operate and regulate stool banks.

Monika Fischer, MD, MS, a gastroenterologist at Indiana University Health, told Healio Gastroenterology and Liver Disease that the group made up of more than 30 experts began planning more than a year ago. They sought to build on previous FMT guidelines by providing recommendations specifically to address the operation of stool banks and the distribution of fecal samples. READ MORE

FDA hears testimony on enforcement discretion of FMT for C. diff

The FDA held a public comment session on Monday in Washington, D.C., to hear testimony on the agency’s policy on enforcement discretion of fecal microbiota transplantation for patients with recurrent Clostridioides difficile infection, as well as what is needed to make a path forward toward approval.

Manufacturers, researchers, clinicians and patients were on hand to discuss how the policy has impacted everything from enrollment in clinical trials to the actual management of sick patients. READ MORE

Guest commentary: FMT, ‘a life-saving therapy,’ needs physician, industry cooperation

In this guest commentary, Jessica Allegretti, MD, MPH, of the Brigham and Women’s Hospital Crohn’s and Colitis Center, discusses the recent FDA hearing on the agency’s policy of enforcement discretion of fecal microbiota transplantation for recurrent Clostridioides difficile infection. READ MORE

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